Repairing A Good Size Hole In Ceiling ?

Hello,
Lots of good advice on my previous Post regarding the damage from a pinhole leak in Copper water pipe in my ceiling. Much thanks to all. Tis is really a great Forum.
Would probably be willing to try re-plastering the damaged section myself to save some $. So, the following questions, please:
Obviously, I cut out the water damaged section first. This is on the ceiling.
a. Can I assume that I got all of it, or should I put some shellac, or something, over the raw drywall edges ?
Is the ceiling probably made from what is called Drywall, or is it termed Plasterboard, or... ? BTW: 35 year old house.
b. There seem to be many, many, spackling type of products available. I'm not even sure that Spackling Compound is the right product word for what I want to do.
The damaged section, after being cleaned out, and removed, is about 6" wide by perhaps 18" length.
What product do I want to use ? Brand, etc.? Very specific suggestions would be appreciated.
c. I guess I have to put something in the cutout first, to have a semi-rigid "something" to push the spackle, or whatever, against. I read about the trick of using a board, with a light cord to hold it down, wedged into the hole. And about using crushed newspaper, etc. How would a Professional Plasterer go about it ?
In this modern day age of ours, how is this handled ? I think I really need something in the hold to push the spackle against, don't I ?
Any hints, or thoughts on doing all this would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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Put a 20 x 10 inch piece of 1/2 or 3/4 plywood thru the hole, diagonally so it will go thru, and then rotate it so that it covers the hole. Use 4 drywall or sheetrock, they're both the same, screws in the 4 sides to hold the plywood in place. A drywall screw in the middle of the plywood before putting it thrui the hole will make it easier to position and hold until the 4 perimeter screws are in place, then remove the handle. Now cut a piece of new drywall to fit the opening, and use 4 drywall screws to screw the new drywall to the plywood. Use some drywall compound, any brand will do, mixed with a little white glue and force it into the seam between the old and new drywall. Wait overnight for that to dry, and then tape the seam and mud over the patch until it blends in with the rest of the ceiling. Any brand of drywall mud is fine, the trick is to use several layers and sand between each layer. A light held to the side but close to the ceiling will show any irregularities. A couple of coats of paint and you will be a hero.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Yes, what he said.
And, here are some YouTube videos describing the same basic technique:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pedAiIzFZhM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3w2ac118Fho


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZW64rfhNQM

I don't know about the part where it says to add salt to the mix to make it dry fast. I never heard of that one before.
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I wouldn't add salt, it might weaken the mud. Just be patient. Or, you could set up a fan to blow on the area to speed up the drying proces. But, it the mud is very thick/deep, the surface can dry while the lower (or in your case -upper) layers of mud are still damp.. Then when you sand all hell will break loose.
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install a access panel to be ready for the next leak. just lift it out when needed..
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you sound like my wife... X wife.
I have a kitchen cieling with bathroom directly above it:(
since I moved here in 1972 there have been at least 5 or 6 holes in cieling. to fix a variety of leaks....
A access panel sold at home depot is much more convenient.
Replastering cieling is like welding the hood of your vehice shut for appearance sake....... yep you can do it, but just opening the hood is a lot easier..
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Well access panels are commercially sold at home depot with nice bezels and professional appearance.....
not a typical home made panel in the back of a closet:)
for e that looks better than peeling paint and rippled dry wall after a minor leak
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wrote:

Buy a bag of 45 minute setting mud in powdered form. It will set enough of the next coat in 45 minutes.
Here: http://househomerepair.com/57-The-Many-Types-of-Drywall-Compound.html
Spackle is for nailholes mud is for cracks and drywall. You can do this if you take your time. It is a lot easier to add another coat than it is to sand that stuff.
Colbyt
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A great site for the beginner!!!
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RogerT wrote:

I highly recommend using a setting type drywall compound for patching. They come in several different set times, just use the one you are most comfortable with, all are vastly faster than the drying type pre-mixed compound. I used the 30 minute variety the last time I had a bunch of work to do and by the time I finished going around the room with the first coat, it was just about ready to sand where I had started.
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When making a repair like this, the easiest thing to do is to cut the opening out so that you have access to some of the joists that are already there to screw in a new piece of drywall. Assuming, it's drywall you have. Google is your friend. You also have the option of first screwing a couple pieces of wood that is about 1 x 1 or so to one or more existing joists. Then you can screw the new piece of drywall to the new wood or existing joists, etc depending on what you have to work with, how the joists run, etc. Use drywall screws.
Then you apply tape over the joints, I prefer the sticky mesh type tape, and then apply drywall mud into and over it. As pointed out, there are a variety of choices for that. I generally use standard joint compound, but if you want to do it quickly and don't want to wait for it to dry overnight, etc, there are faster setting versions.
One thing you definitely need is a wide drywall kife. Looks like a big, wide putty knife, like 14" wide. That is essential to taper out the final coat and make it blend into the existing ceiling. Google and I'm sure you'll find how to do it videos. Essentially, you need 3 coats. First is to go over the tape that covers the joints. NExt coat is wider, and last coat is where the 14" knife comes in.
I prefer to wet sand it with a sanding sponge instead of dry sanding it to avoid the dust.
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