Repairing a broken windshield?

Somewhat off topic, but I don't know of a good group for general automotive advice. (any suggestions?)
I just bought a used car yesterday. Today I noticed the tiniest crack in the windshield. There is a tiny chip on the outside, and a tiny black line on the inside.
Can this be "repaired" so it doesn't lead to a cracked windshield?
There is a warranty on the car, but it would be tough to explain why we didn't see it when we test drove the car.
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If it is that tiny, you'd easily miss it. Take it back and show them. Good chance they missed it also.
No, it cannot be repaired. In time, the tiny crack will be a big crack.
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ads for the 'invisible repair' at the glass shop say that if you can cover the chip and the star with a dollar bill, they probably can fix it. They shoot it full of glue with a vacum pump, and the suction cup thing they use is about that diameter. It isn't a perfect fix, but it is pretty cheap, and if it isn't right in your line of vision, it may be good enough to last a few years. Doesn't hurt to ask dealer- they get a discount at the glass shops, and they may be willing to comp it for you as a PR gesture.
aem sends...
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a repair may be possible. there is a national auto glass repair company called Safelite that does stone chip repairs and costs about $50.00. they will drill the area where the chip is and get to the lamination that is between the 2 pieces of glass on a windshield and then inject a clear resin that will fill crack and retard the spreading of the crack so it doesn't continue to spread. there is a slight chance in the process causing the crack to run but it usually doesn't happen and the repair can last for years. insurance companies will usually pay the cost for a repair rather than pay for a new windshield if you have comp. coverage.
good luck...
mike.............
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rec.autos.tech is a superb one.
There are also specific ones for your make, but we don't know what that is, as you have not given it.

YES! This CAN be fixed very easily for about $60. Time is important here. Do not leave it alone. The longer you leave it, the more the crack will spread, and the less the likelihood of a successful repair.
Any good auto glass place will have "stone chip repair" equipment. The fix involves usng vacuum and resins to fill the crack and bond it together so it doesn't spread. They will tell you up front if the crack can be properly repaired or not. A good repair is PERMANENT.
The repair will be hard to see. After they've done it, you will have difficulty spotting the fix unless you know exactly where to look, and under what light.
This sort of stone chip repair is one of those genuine advances in automotive repair. It is especially beneficial if you still have the original windshield.
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TeGGeR

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TeGGeR wrote:

TeGGeR is correct, it can be repaired and "Safelite Auto Glass" has a separate dept that does nothing but repair W/S's.
They would be your best choice, other companies would rather replace than repair.
Safelite does this to keep the insurance companies happy.
BTW, there is a chance that the crack can be made worse while attempting the repair but yours sounds like a simple repair.
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<snip>

It depends on the company, I suppose. The ones I've dealt with up here in Ontario, Canada have been more than happy to do the resin repair.
Many glass places are franchises, and quality is variable. I happen to be blessed with an excellent outlet within driving distance of me. They will even allow me to inspect and seal the pinchweld before they bond new glass. How about that?

Correct. And a good shop will give you this warning before they take on the work. The fly-by-nights won't.
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I repaired one myself years ago- wet drilled small hole to dead end the crack, used epoxy to fill. Lasted a couple of years, then I guess the continued flexing led the crack to spread. Was very laborious- you have to drill slowly, and I wouldn't do it again or recommend it unless the $50 is a lot of money to you. It was a learning experience. Some years later, I had Triumph Auto Glass replace a Honda Civic windshield for $100. So price out that option- it's nice to have a new, clear windshield. Of course try to get seller to pay all or some of whichever option you decide on- get over there real soon to show them the crack.
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TeGGeR wrote:

That's surprising because they don't really make any money on repairs. A repair cost $50 (average) and takes anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes and most w/s replacements can be done in 30-45 minutes and the glass has a markup of 100%-200%-300%.

What do you mean by "seal"?

More like a good tech will inform you, trust me most companies could care less if they make your crack worse they want to sell glass.

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<snip>
Patch up the paint scratches made by the paino wire used to cut the old glass adhesive. There are always a few, and they need to be covered at least by pinchweld primer, if not by paint.
If you don't do that, you'll eventually get rust in the pinchweld, which you won't see until you get water leaks, or rust bubbling up from under the trim.
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TeGGeR wrote:

The installer is supposed to cover any nicks in the pinchwelds paint with urethane primer.
If they aren't, they are doing a lousy job!
It's any easy out for the companies that offer a lifetime warranty against leaks (most do) by saying "your car is rusting out we can't warranty that". Good thing you know whats going on if you have a lot of glass work done, because there are many so called "autoglass techs" out there, that either don't know what they are doing, or don't care!
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Yep.
Yep. That's why you need a shop that will allow you to do your own check before the new adhesive goes on.
Installers are working to a budget and to a time constraint. Even the good ones can miss one or two scratches. The lighting in most glass places isn't great, which adds to the problem.

Yep. It's YOUR car. Look after it yourself.
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read the warranty, some include/some exclude glass and light bulbs etc. take it back too. if you are stuck, ask around at an auto glass company for the owner and his best cash price for your vehicle's new windshield [it may be sitting right on his inventory shelf]. we use buffalo auto glass, buffalo ny. very good.
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I'll agree with almost everyone else and say get it repaired by an auto glass shop - they'll usually come to your workplace or whatever to fix it for you, and the crack won't even be visible when they're done (in my experience - this has happened a couple times). Since it hasn't been mentioned much here, I'll recommend calling your insurance company - I have pretty basic coverage, but they cover all glass repairs - much cheaper than replacing the whole windshield. Good luck and act fast, Andy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

True, some states require the insurance companies to replace a broken w/s with no outta pocket expense to the customer.
If you happen to have State Farm, all of the glass in the car is covered w/o a deductible. (If you have comprehensive coverage)
If it's a small chip, I recommend having it repaired, especially if this is a newer car with the original w/s.
There are A LOT of "glass techs" out there that are butchers and will do a bad job of replacing the glass. Not saying that it will leak or not look good but might not stayed attached to the car correctly if you are in an accident.
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Try rec.autos.tech

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Toller wrote:

What do you might lead to a crack. It has a crack. Forget about repairing it, you have a warranty. People often don't notice cracks. I got a car from a friend that was moving and didn't notice a chip on the passenger side for nearly 3 weeks. Same way with a couple of tiny ding.
If the warranty won't cover it, check with a windshield repair service. They will probably drill a hole to stop the crack running and then suck the clear filler/cement into the crack with vacuum. I had chips fixed by a place recommended by my insurance company. The guy came to my house. I asked him what the cost would be if I didn't have insurance and he told me the normal cost is about $50 per car. You can see the filled places but you have to look just right to see them.
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