Repairing a Bent Wellhead

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I'd cut off the top of the casing and see about getting a piece to extend it. Then pull the pump and check it out visually. While it's out figure out the voltage and amps. That plus the distance form the house will let you figure out the wire size to run. Buy a piece of direct burial wire. Presuming the pump looks ok you can briefly power it out of the well to see if it at least seems to work. Drop it back down the well and power it up and see if you get water. If it's pumping water I suggest you run it for a couple hours to see if it runs the well dry. If all that goes ok you can bury the wire, get a outdoor junction box and a cap for the top of the casing.
You need to sort out the pressure tank and pressure switch. Each well needs it's own. SInce each well is servicing a single house they can be located at the house or the well. If it freezes I suggest at the house.
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Actually, I don't think pressure tanks were previously used for either well, which might be why the pump for the good well (not the damaged one) got burned up shortly after the 2nd house was hooked to it (just a guess). They suspected a leak in the line to the 2nd house was causing the pump to run constantly, but I wonder if the use of a tank could have somewhat avoided damage to the pump?
I wonder how long a pump would last if you just turned it on and left it on?
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It would run a long time but would fail sooner than normal. If it had a pressure switch somewhere in the line it still should have shut off the pump. No tank would also cause early pump failure. The pressure tank keeps the pump from constantly cycling on and off when water is turned on.
You need a pressure tank and a pressure switch for each well. The typical set up is to have the tank and switch at the house. Then run the power from the switch to the pump. If you are in a location with no or light freezing you can build a small well cover and put the tank and switch at the well.
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I'd be very surprised if there was no tank before. It's very standard to have at least a small tank, 20 gallons+ for any residential well like that. Otherwise you have no pressure buffer and the pump will short cycle. As stated above, it's usually not at the well head, but located in the house with a pressure switch.
The only wells I've seen with no tank are for irrigation systems. In those the demand is constant and the pump is turned on by the irrigation controller.
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I helped drain the water from the heater tanks and the lines from both houses in preperation for winter absences, and there was no mention of any pressure tank that needed to be drained. There is no tank at the well; the well is right next to the house.
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wrote:

There are now "constant pressure" switches. I don't know if they operate through pressure tank and really haven't dug into how they operate. My understanding is that they turn on every time water is drawn. I could be mistaken.
Harry K
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Commonly found on boats and rvs. Often built into the pump. Not so much on houses.
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From what little I have read on them it seems they are becoming more common.
Harry K
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I guess those might avoid pressure swings, if they react fast enough. Got one of them here. It's set to about 50psi. But the well installer still put in a tank and that was for a system that is used for irrigation plus some general yard use, not potable water. The fancy valve just keeps the pressure constant. I think it's essentially two valves in parallel with the water flow from the well. One valve has a large capacity and only opens at 50PSI+, The other path goes around the bigger valve and is open all the time, but only allows a small amount of water to flow. Hence you can get all the water the well will deliver at 50psi or below. Above that the water can still flow to finish bringing the pressure up slowly until the pump turns off.
Well installer here would have eliminated the tank if it was for the automatic sprinkler system only. But since we wanted it to use with a regular hose, bucket, etc, then he added the tank. Which makes sense to me, because with the sprinklers you have constant demand for a long time. With a house you have small incremental usage, which with all the starts and stops would wear out a pump with or without the constant pressure valve and also use more electricity.
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On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:10:14 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

install, someone was negligent.
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The well cap has an elbow in it for the electrical, so I don't see why they would have run the electrical in through any other point.
Last time I was up there, I could see a green T-shaped thing about 2 feet down that is probably the pitless adapter. I'll take some pics within the next few days and post back.
There is a pvc line terminating openly above ground near the well, so I'd guess that's what leads to the well. If I could just get the proper power to the existing line, I should be able to test it like it is.
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Yes, that will be the pitless adapter. If you can reach the "t", a firm pull should slide it right out. It fits into a flat, sloped "slide" with no fasteners other than gravity.
Harry K
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Is that PVC broken off? Normally they put a T into the line after it exits the pitless adapter. The top of the T is brought up next to the well head and is plugged so it can be used for testing, or blowing out the line for winterization if needed, etc. The other question in you case is what's going on with the other end of the line that used to go to the trailer. If you turn on the pump you may see water coming out not only at the PVC you see by the well, but over where the trailer used to be.

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The PVC going to the former trailer is the one that I'm referring to. I dont see any other pipe, other than for the electrical.
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I find that things that have not been removed for a loooong time tend to not just "slide right out".
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+1...
Same for things that were screwed or bolted together tend not to come apart easily after sitting out exposed to the weather for any length of time...
~~ Evan
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