Repairing 3" PVC stack w/ slip coupling

This is a very basic question so I apologize if this is obvious, yet I couldn't find anything on the web except basic instructions for doing this sort of procedure - and I just can't make it work.
I have added a new waste to a 3" PVC stack in my basement. So I cut out about a 3 foot section (I cut that much in order to remove another leaking slip joint above where I was putting the new tee) and put in a sanitary tee at the bottom of the gap I created in the stack. I cut another piece of 3" that is a little bit shorter than the remaining gap and can now slip it into the top of the new tee. There is no give at the top or bottom, so a slip connector is needed to complete the repair.
The question is exactly how do I get this dang slip connector to work? I can barely slide it onto the pipe dry, so I figured once I put the cement on, it would be lubricated enough that I could move it around for at least a few seconds before the cement sets, to get it in the right place. I tried, twice, putting cement on the new repair pipe section, and sliding it down, with the intention of pushing it back over the end of the existing cut to close the gap once the repair pipe was in place. Problem is, while I can easily push the connector (when covered with cement) all the way onto the end of the pipe, I can't make it budge back off again for the life of me in order to connect with the existing stack. The cement isn't bonding this fast, it just gets stuck. I can push it , hammer it, whatever - it just won't move back once it's pushed onto the end of the pipe.
It's almost as if the slip connector is just too tight. Or, is there some kind of trick here that I should be aware of? Should I cut off a couple more inches of my "repair" section so I don't have to push the slip connector as far onto the pipe - leaving a larger gap between the ends of the pipes, and less bonding area for the slip connector? Thanks for any thoughts.
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J T wrote:

Rather than a PVC coupling: http://www.fernco.com/NH.html
Slide the rubber part completely over one pipe and push into place. Then slide the rubber back halfway. Tighten clamps. Prolly even find them at HD.
Jim
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I actually got one of those already that as an "interim" solution so someone doesn't flush the toilet into my utility room. I suppose there's nothing wrong with it, but I'd rather weld it if there's no reason (other than my own lack of skill) not to...

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J T wrote:

They're used by the thousands every day. I think you're asking for trouble with the glued couplings...

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I already got trouble with it... two wasted couplers, one wasted hour, good amount of PVC cement on my hands, and lots of cursing... so your point is well taken.

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Stick with the rubber Fernco coupling. If you ever get a chance to look over the plumbing of a commercial building, chances are that is all you will find connecting DWV lines. When plumbing with cast iron DWV, that is all the plumbers use! Greg
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Yeah, I've got another one already in my house where the (older) cast iron stack was tapped. It just seemed intuitive as I was dealing with this, that a welded joint will be less likely to have problems in the future so I wanted to do it that way and keep it 100% PVC.
What is funny, is that when I began this project I realized the stack was leaking at another slip joint (which I cut out)... as installed by the "real" plumber who did the last round of work in my house. So apparently I am not the only one having trouble installing those things properly...
Anyway the fernco is permanently in place now, it's done. Thanks for the advice everyone.

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http://www.fernco.com/NH.html
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