Repair toy steam engine

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I have always wanted to get my toy steam engine working again that I got many years ago but the whistle/safety valve on top of the tank fell off. I know how to solder and sweat pipes but am unsure as the best way to try and repair it and what kind of tool and solder to use and I believe the tank is chromed. I have a 100 watt solder gun. It is a nice looking toy and I don't want to damage it if it requires some special tool or technique. Where would I take something like that to get repaired if I decide not to attempt to repair it. The manufacturer is Wilesco in Germany and a quick Google search did not find any repair center. It looks similar to the one in the link below.--- Steve
http://www.yesteryeartoys.com/cgi-local/toycatalog.cfm?view 0
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 12:41:39 -0600, "Steven L Umbach"

On mine, that hole was threaded.
Commodore Joe Redcloud
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The plug you remove to fill the water on mine is threaded but the whistle was just soldered on and fell off on day. I guess I was lucky it did not rocket off ! --- Steve
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You might want to try this inquiry on rec.models.railroads and ask for pointers to a "live steam" group in an area near you. The "live steam" railroad modeling folks know a lot about fixing stuff like this.
If you can't find such an outfit near you, you might want to google on "silver solder" or "high temperature solder(s).
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Thanks Jim. That is good info. --- Steve
"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in message

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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 12:41:39 -0600, "Steven L Umbach"

I haven't see thepicture yyet, but I would consider glueing (sp?) it.
Maybe it would be better soldered if you were trying to preserve some antique value but for use, glue is easiert to control and easier to get a good job. And, you can later take off some glues, and solder it later, if that ever matters.
I like ambroid cement, removable 5-minute epoxy quick, sticks to a variety of things, read the labels 30 mintue epoxy PC-70 really strong, can be applied even to a dripping pipe Elmers white gule good for porous, like wood. and the big?? brand? of contact cement in the red tube. the only flexible glues I know, for cloth, vinyl, etc.
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wrote:

These are working steam engines. That boiler gets HOT and pressurized. I don't think glue is going to do it in this case.
Commodore Joe Redcloud
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 20:18:53 GMT, Commodore Joe Redcloud

I thought it was Lionel.

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Nope! These are really well made toy steam engines that actually run. You fill the boiler with water, and burn a little tray of solid fuel under it to build up a head of steam. Some people build (or buy) miniature sawmills and other devices that the steam engine can power. I still have the one I got for Christmas about 45 years ago and I still drag it out every couple of years and fire it up.
Commodore Joe Redcloud
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 22:11:42 GMT, Commodore Joe Redcloud

Cool
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It sounds like a Jensen Steam Engine. Made in Jeannette PA. They have a website, they will repair yjeir units if you ship them your steam engine, provided they made it. Or you can buy a new one. My dad recently got his repaired.
Stretch
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Try this:
http://www.jensensteamengines.com /
And this:
http://www.toysteam.net /
Stretch
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That's a good tip! Most of them were made in Germany, but Jensen seems to be a very similar product.
Commodore Joe Redcloud
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check with a local plumber, since they solder copper fittings all the time, or ask at a local welding shop, since they tend to get all sorts of custom jobs.
heck even a roofer can probably fix it, provided they do copper roofs
its actually easy, clean both parts of all mating surfaces, apply flux, which helps clean and prep surfaces. put pieces together clamp if necessary. probably best to use a propane torch, heat the pieces, only apply solder once all parts are hot, always apply solder to the parts, DONT HEAT SOLDER WITH FLAME< HEAT SURFACES, LET SOLDER MELT AND FLOW! wipe with cloth to smooth it out
there are books about soldering
when done let cool, clean the area thoroughly and enjoy your repair!
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Thanks. I was wondering about that. I have done a lot of soldering on electronics but it has a nickel tank and getting the whistle to stay in place looks to be a bit of a challenge. I probably will pay someone to do it. I could buy a new one but it just would not be the same. I always get to thinking about doing it every time Christmas rolls around. --- Steve

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Yelp, buy a new one. Thats is how Commrade Joe repairs everything.
TJ
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It is a Wilesco but thanks for the information as it is helpful. --- Steve

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Ah the memories. I want to fire mine up again at age 54. I used to love running it. I had a wood workshop that I could attach to mine. Mine is about the same age as yours. My Uncle got it for me after I saw it in the window at Marshal Fields in downtown Chicago when I was a kid. I took out my Lionel train the other day that is about the same age and has not been used in more then 40 years and got it running. It has a motor with replaceable brushes though I cleaned up the old ones and steel wooled the part of the motor the brushes contact [can't think of proper name offhand] and oiled the gears to get it to work like new. --- Steve
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My sadly long-gone Wilesco was the simple one with the single acting oscillating cylinder. However the safety valve and whistle on the one in the photo appear the same as I remember on mine. I'm not sure what you mean when you say they fell off. They screw into separate openings on the boiler (which IIRC was brass and either nickel or chrome plated.) Perhaps you've just lost them? If you cannot find them just order from the maker:
http://www.wilesco.de/wilesco/us/index.html
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The filler cap screws in but the whistle just was soldered on. The photo is not exactly my model but I just wanted to show a picture to make sure those interested had an idea what I was talking about. Almost all kids today would not have a clue as to what a toy steam engine is. So sad. Thanks. --- Steve

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