Repair Question

In my house i have old plaster type walls, and there is a spot on one of them were the plaster has fallen off...it looks to be the size of a baseball,
my question is what is the best way to repair it so it doesnt look noticable?
emails are welcome
thanks in advance
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On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 20:46:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Is something going on behind the wall to make it fall off that you need to repair, before the plaster?
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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no nothing goin on behind the wall... no leak or anything....i was trying to hang a picture and it seems like the vibration of me hammering the hook in caused it to break....
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Hang a picture over it.
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use Durabond 20 or 45 to fill it in. 20 sets up in 20 minutes, 45 in 45 minutes. You can just fill in the approximate depth and then tool in a smooth or matching final coat, or use a topping coat of plaster paris or drywall compound or more durabond. The durabond is hard to sand so do not over fill. It will sag down on you if you start with it too watery.
Bob S. wrote:

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thanks for the helpful tips.... you said "it will sag down on you if you start with it too watery"
is there by chance a pre-made kind to get so i dont make the mistake
thanks in advance
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no, not really. but it's not a big concern, you can always chip it off. but I'm just saying don't walk away after troweling some in there. keep an eye on it for five minutes, and put it back if it sags down and out. you will be doing multiple applications anyway, and if you use the 20 minute mix, it goes fast.
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once i get it troweled smooth, and sanded , is there anything else needed to be done before i paint it?...
i apologize for all the questions, i just never had to repair anything like this before and want to make sure i do it right
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