Repair of door threshold

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I hope I am explaining this properly.
My front door has a metal plate installed underneath the door, that is mounted to the floor. I call it the threshold, and I hope that is the proper term for it. Anyway, last year I mixed some powdered concrete mix, and pushed it in underneath the threshold.
Now the cement is cracking, and I removed it in hopes of putting something else besides concrete underneath the threshold plate. This is the plate everyone walks on when entering my home.
Does anyone have some ideas for me?
Many thanks.
Kate
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body style="font-size: 10pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial;" bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#330000"> I hope I am explaining this properly.<br> <br> My front door has a metal plate installed underneath the door, that is mounted to the floor.&nbsp; I call it the threshold, and I hope that is the proper term for it.&nbsp; Anyway,&nbsp; last year I mixed some powdered concrete mix, and pushed it in underneath the threshold.<br> <br> Now the cement is cracking, and I removed it in hopes of putting something else besides concrete underneath the threshold plate.&nbsp; This is the plate everyone walks on when entering my home.<br> <br> Does anyone have some ideas for me?<br> <br> Many thanks.<br> <br> Kate<br> </body> </html>
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What were you trying to accomplish? Was the old one loose, flexing...?

The concrete shouldn't have cracked if it was mixed and placed properly. Is it possible you're talking about mortar mix or just plain cement? Mortar mix is cement plus sand and concrete has cement and fine and coarse aggregate (sand and rocks/pebbles). Cement has one ingredient: cement - no sand and no aggregate. If you used straight cement it's no surprised it cracked. The aggregate is what gives concrete its strength.
Let's analyze what you did before offering up a solution. How big is the space you're trying to fill? It sounds like you didn't remove the threshold before placing the mix - any reason why?
R
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I really need detailed pics of the situation.
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RicodJour wrote:

About a year ago, I replaced the concrete underneath the door threshold as it was cracking, and every time I swept around the front door, I would get more pieces of loose concrete.
I think you hit the nail on the head. I used concrete, not mortar mix. The area is the length of the door, and very thin underneath the threshold.
From what I can see, the threshold cannot be removed unless I remove the door frame. I personally don't know how to do that, but I can get someone to do it for me.
Thanks.
Kate
--------------090908080804090909080605 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#330000"> RicodJour wrote: <blockquote cite=" snipped-for-privacy@22g2000hsm.googlegroups.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">On Oct 9, 12:40 am, Kate <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@nwi.net">&lt; snipped-for-privacy@nwi.net&gt;</a> wrote: </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I hope I am explaining this properly.
My front door has a metal plate installed underneath the door, that is mounted to the floor. I call it the threshold, and I hope that is the proper term for it. Anyway, last year I mixed some powdered concrete mix, and pushed it in underneath the threshold. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> What were you trying to accomplish? Was the old one loose, flexing...?
</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Now the cement is cracking, and I removed it in hopes of putting something else besides concrete underneath the threshold plate. This is the plate everyone walks on when entering my home. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> The concrete shouldn't have cracked if it was mixed and placed properly. Is it possible you're talking about mortar mix or just plain cement? Mortar mix is cement plus sand and concrete has cement and fine and coarse aggregate (sand and rocks/pebbles). Cement has one ingredient: cement - no sand and no aggregate. If you used straight cement it's no surprised it cracked. The aggregate is what gives concrete its strength.
Let's analyze what you did before offering up a solution. How big is the space you're trying to fill? It sounds like you didn't remove the threshold before placing the mix - any reason why?
R
</pre> </blockquote> About a year ago, I replaced the concrete underneath the door threshold as it was cracking, and every time I swept around the front door, I would get more pieces of loose concrete.<br> <br> I think you hit the nail on the head.&nbsp; I used concrete, not mortar mix.&nbsp; The area is the length of the door, and very thin underneath the threshold.<br> <br> From what I can see, the threshold cannot be removed unless I remove the door frame.&nbsp; I personally don't know how to do that, but I can get someone to do it for me.<br> <br> Thanks.<br> <br> Kate<br> </body> </html>
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For a quick fix, try "Quikrete No. 8640, Gray Concrete Seal" which could fill gaps up to 1/2" thick and has some give so it shouldn't crack.
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** Frank ** wrote:

Thank you so much Frank. Someone today told me I could also use Pig Putty. I have never heard of it.
Kate
--------------060109000804050801040706 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#330000"> ** Frank ** wrote:<br> <blockquote cite="midefGdnRH6i_XoZpHanZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">For a quick fix, try "Quikrete No. 8640, Gray Concrete Seal" which could fill gaps up to 1/2" thick and has some give so it shouldn't crack.
</pre> </blockquote> Thank you so much Frank.&nbsp; Someone today told me I could also use Pig Putty.&nbsp; I have never heard of it.<br> <br> Kate<br> </body> </html>
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fill gaps up to 1/2" thick and has some give so it shouldn't crack.
</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV>Thank you so much Frank.&nbsp; Someone today told me I could also use Pig Putty.&nbsp; I have never heard of it.<BR><BR>Kate<BR></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial color=#000000 size=2> <DIV><FONT face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>Me either and this is the info: <A href="http://www.newpig.com.au/ProdDetails.asp?ProdCode=PTY201 ">http://www.newpig.com.au/ProdDetails.asp?ProdCode=PTY201 </A></FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Whatever you use, be sure the threshold don't flex under weight and seal tight against water intrusion to prevent termites and dry rot. </DIV></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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Kate wrote:

    First, are you trying to secure the threshold with the concrete, or just fill in the gap?
    If you are trying to secure the threshold, that method is not very good. I have found that drilling a hole into the concrete floor (if that is the situation) with a masonry bit and filling that hole with wooden dowel rod is the best way. Cut off the dowel rod flush with the floor and drill a hole for the screws used to secure the threshold into it. The dowel rod will expand outward once the screws are installed holding down the threshold.
    If your problem is filling a gap and not one of securing the threshold, I found cutting wood the size of the threshold to fill the gap is very effective. Plywood comes in various sizes and often solves the problem.
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Ken wrote:

Yes, I just want to fill the gap. The wood idea is excellent. If done right, I should never have to deal with it again, or at least years down the road.
Many, many thanks.
Kate
--------------000502080301040900000405 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#330000"> Ken wrote:<br> <blockquote cite="midLLCdnbgON8lN75banZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com" type="cite">Kate wrote: <br> <blockquote type="cite">I hope I am explaining this properly. <br> <br> My front door has a metal plate installed underneath the door, that is mounted to the floor.&nbsp; I call it the threshold, and I hope that is the proper term for it.&nbsp; Anyway,&nbsp; last year I mixed some powdered concrete mix, and pushed it in underneath the threshold. <br> <br> Now the cement is cracking, and I removed it in hopes of putting something else besides concrete underneath the threshold plate.&nbsp; This is the plate everyone walks on when entering my home. <br> <br> Does anyone have some ideas for me? <br> <br> Many thanks. <br> <br> Kate <br> </blockquote> <br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;First, are you trying to secure the threshold with the concrete, or just fill in the gap? <br> <br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If you are trying to secure the threshold, that method is not very good.&nbsp; I have found that drilling a hole into the concrete floor (if that is the situation) with a masonry bit and filling that hole with wooden dowel rod is the best way.&nbsp; Cut off the dowel rod flush with the floor and drill a hole for the screws used to secure the threshold into it.&nbsp; The dowel rod will expand outward once the screws are installed holding down the threshold. <br> <br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If your problem is filling a gap and not one of securing the threshold, I found cutting wood the size of the threshold to fill the gap is very effective.&nbsp; Plywood comes in various sizes and often solves the problem. <br> </blockquote> Yes, I just want to fill the gap.&nbsp; The wood idea is excellent.&nbsp; If done right, I should never have to deal with it again, or at least years down the road.<br> <br> Many, many thanks.<br> <br> Kate <br> </body> </html>
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