repair natural gas pipe leak?

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wrote:

more power to you. Can't do it here if you are getting an inspection, so I just use pipe dope, even when I'm NOT getting an inspection. Hate to have someone else working on it later, needing an inspection, and having it failed and come back on me. Ain't going to happen, buddy. Do tit once, do it right.
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if you READ the internet, and CONSIDER the products that ARE for SALE, you might FIND some teflon TAPE which is SUITED for GAS pipes. http://www.google.com/products?q=gas+teflon+tape+&hl=en&aq=f
THE techs around MY area TELL me that TEFLON paste isn't good, beCAUSE it dries OUT and leaks, LATER.
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Mix a tablespoon or two of dish soap with water and paint it on the pipes with a paint brush. Do every fitting and watch for bubbles. If there are sections of pipe that are heavy rusted, do the same to them. Actually if they are heavily rusted, I'd replace all of them. Spending $100 (or less) on new pipe is cheaper and safer than having your house explode and burn.
You DONT take the pipes apart like you described. Shut off the gas at the meter. Unscrew the union next to the meter on the pipe entering the house, and begin taking all the pipes apart. Gas pipes usually come apart pretty easily, unlike rusted water pipes. If you got a lot of pipes, label them if you cant remember where they go. Then put them all back together using gas approved pipe dope. Like I said, if the pipes are badly rusted, replace them. If it's just a surface rust, I'd wire brush them and apply some black spray paint. After you get it all back together, do the soap and water thing again.
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On Jul 2, 4:01 am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

What planet are you from ?
Every plumber I have ever seen fix existing gas piping NEVER starts disassembling the entire system from the meter back to where the leak is... They sacrifice a length of pipe either where the leak is, or in a leak adjacent area where it is easier to work and REPLACE the piping including the section they cut to disassemble...
Remember, gas piping can be cut and threaded to any length needed... It just takes a skilled person to see where the easiest point of attack to fix the problem is... It is NOT taking every length of pipe and fitting out starting from the meter, that is patently ridiculous...
~~ Evan
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Typically, there is a union in the system some where. If it's not possible to get to the union, it's possible to shut off the gas, and then cut the pipe with a pipe cutter, or sawzall. Then use shorter pieces, and a union.
http://www.bramec.com/brands/detail.asp?cat 36&ManuID=bramec
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Why not a bit of flexible metallic hose instead of a union?
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That would accomplish much the same. I know that the codes don't like flex hose, except for backs of appliance like stove. Not sure why.
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Over time it can develop leaks if it is flexed enough. Check your local code though. Some used to say no flex except for stoves, others now want flex because of potential seismic movement that could break regular pipe joints. .
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