repair Formica nick

Just discovered a small nick in our two-year-old Formica countertop. I suspect our ADD niece (22) wasn't paying attention while cutting up her veggies for lunch, and now I need to make a repair and need advice on how to make the repair.
It's not a simple patch, as the nick is raised on one side so that there's a very small bump to the counter surface. And idea what I could use to soften the Formica and smooth it down? The nick itself might not even be visible if I can get the surface to flow a bit and smooth-out.
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Formica is a thermoset plastic and does not soften, so you're out of luck there. Try something like a cyanoacrylate glue, cover it with wax paper and apply a smooth heavy weight. Acetone is specific for removal of excess glue after it sets up. Put all the sharp knives in a locked drawer and take the niece down to the nearest kitchenware store and buy her a personalized cutting board. Good luck.
Joe
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On 5/4/2011 12:39 PM, Kyle wrote:

I agree with Joe's response but I'd probably look into Formica repair kits that are out there:
http://www.lifetimerepairkits.com/Wood_Formica_Chip_Repair_kit.html
I know nothing about this one or others but just googled it up.
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That kit looks just like a boat gelcoat repair kit :-)
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I would take the rounded handle of some metal kitchen utensil and press down VERY hard while rubbing it slowly back and forth across the raised nick, to sort of cold flow the plastic back into position. I have actually done this on a couple of small (1/4' long) bumps in a countertop. You don't say how big the nick is so I'm guessing it isn't too long or deep. If the depressed area is still noticeable, I would mix a small amount of epoxy, like a drop or two, add a 1/4 - 1/2 drop of white paint, mix the two together, and apply to the hole using the end of a pin. You can fill in the nick almost to the top, and the surrounding area will take the daily wear and tear so that the patch should be reasonably durable. The trick is to get equal parts of the epoxy so it sets up correctly. Good luck and tell us what you do.
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I used a piece of Formica countertop taken out of an office. It was a desk island. I wasn't watching, and when I put the screws in from underneath, it dimpled some places, and in others broke out a 3/8" square or so. After much thought, I bought some colored epoxy, and filled the holes. I let it sit for 48 hours. I then took a router with a 1/2" bit that was flat on the end, and carefully routed it down to the level of the surface. A little very fine sanding after that made it "acceptable". I don't know what your color or pattern is, but you may consider this method.
Steve
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