Repaint Concrete Porch

Fist of all, I don't think I would have ever painted the concrete porch - I would have left it alone.
Nevertheless, the provious owner(s) of my house painted the porch brick red. Then they repainted it beige.
Now, It has started to get bare spots and crack and chip. I pressure washed off as mch of both layers of paint as is possible, but sopme spots just wouldn't come off. I tried sanding, and still, some spots aren't coming off. I tried using a chemical peeler/stripper, and I honestly don't have the time to do the whole porch.
Are there any good options for painting over the spotty paint and strip jobs that would yield a decent looking result?
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we use interlocking colorful or black mats 24" square from wholesale club or walmart sports excercise or automotive dept. to give a soft underfoot feel and hose rinseable surface for the dog.
consider carpeting appropriate for your porch use and climate?
there is a golf lawn like astroturf to consider.
vinyl back janitor mats with polyester rug on top are very durable but hold the rainwater so are better inside the porch door here in buffalo ny.
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The porch is exposed to the elements. So, I would not consider astro-turf.
It also has a single step, so... I'm not sure how the interlocking vinyl mats would work....
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yea, get what you can off. As you have done, scrape, sand pressurewash, chemical stripper, etc. You do not mention heat. A heat gun or a torch may also loosen the paint and allow scraping. Wash everything real good then repaint. I would use an epoxy paint and do the prep they suggest. HCL/Muriatic acid may be called for as another poster suggests but I do not know if that would be an effective stripper mut may be recomended as a last step before using the epoxy after the stripping.
how ecer you look at it it will be a lot of work. Spend the time in prep and you will have an end product that will outlast you. If you do not prep properly and cheap out on materials you will be right back where you are now in a few years.
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2 part epoxy is the way to go. You might try etching with HCL first.

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Check with several tool rental companies in your area. Explain your problem and see what advise they offer. They should provide some useful suggestions which may include:
- Using a very high pressure washer, which is much more powerful then the "toys" that most homeowners possess. In addition to the very high pressure, some of these units have heaters for the water. Just be certain that you are renting a 120v unit or that you have the correct hookup if you are renting a 240v unit.
- Using a pressure washer attachment which entrains sand with the water output. This combines the features of a pressure washer with those of a sandblaster. This gives less damage to the concrete, but it still performs much better than just using high pressure water alone.
- Some careful use of a traditional sandblaster.
I've had reasonable good luck getting paint off concrete. Don't forget to attack problem areas at a sufficient angle so that the water and/or sand has the best opportunity to gain purchase under the paint and lift it off. If you are using a traditional sandblaster, proceed with caution if you aren't experienced. The sandblaster will "eat" into the concrete surface. That's not a big problem if you don't use it often and you are careful to avoid going too deep and careful to "feather-edge" problem areas.
You may want to consider getting quotes on hiring out the work after you estimate what the tool rental will cost plus the value of your time. It may be just as economical to hire out the work, plus you will toss the responsibility of doing a quality job onto somebody else.
Good luck, Gideon
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why repaint? consider pouring inch or so new concrete in what ever color you wish for horizontal surface and thin stucco the verticle.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net wrote why repaint? consider pouring inch or so new concrete in what ever color you wish for horizontal surface and thin stucco the verticle.
================== Do you have even a vague idea what you are talking about?
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Having repaired concrete porch and steps with layers of old paint and surface cracks and spalling I have a pretty good Idea.
He could also use a belt sander and epoxy if surface is not cracked and pitted as I had to contednd with.

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For the record - the job is done and it looks good.
I had good luck using "Stripeeze" on the patchy stuff and where all three (3!) coats were still smooth, the heat gun was very effective. Make sure you are wearing good thick leather (gardeng type) gloves with the heat gun - just in case that hand holding the scraper gets in the path of the hot air.
I finished it with an epoxy paint - it did a good job on some of the small pits and not so good on the larger pits, but hey, it's a concrete porch on a 50yo house.
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