removing vinyl tile and direct heat


I have some old commercial vinyl tile I'm taking up.
I've noticed this is impossible without adding heat. How is this typically done. The electric heat gun was slow and hot! Currently I'm leaving an iron on a patch and using a machete to lift it off. That still takes a minute or two per tile. Softening temp seems to be around 170F.
Surely this is often done and there are faster methods.
Jeff
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Jeff Thies wrote:

Pneumatic tile scraper? http://www.harborfreight.com/long-reach-air-scraper-37073.html
Might be able to rent one... You'll only need it for thirty minutes.
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wrote:

That requires a big assed (10cfm @90PSI) compressor. It is also intended for ceramic tile on thinset, and the tip is kind of blunt. It mostly just breaks the tiles. I'm not sure it could get under glued down vinyl tile very easily.
The Harbor Freight Multi tool with a scraper blade might be very helpful and effective. It costs $39 and is useful for a lot of other impossible jobs, too.
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/multifunction-tools/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html
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wrote:

That requires a big assed (10cfm @90PSI) compressor. It is also intended for ceramic tile on thinset, and the tip is kind of blunt. It mostly just breaks the tiles. I'm not sure it could get under glued down vinyl tile very easily.
The Harbor Freight Multi tool with a scraper blade might be very helpful and effective. It costs $39 and is useful for a lot of other impossible jobs, too.
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/multifunction-tools/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html
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On 8/12/2010 10:33 AM, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I bought a forged scraper on a long handle and sharpened it. It does break the tile but it is very hard to get under it.

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/multifunction-tools/multifunction-power-tool-67256.html
I've heard about that, $39 is good. I can run by Harbor Freight in a few days and get it. Wish I had it now!
Jeff
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Heat guns and irons are good for a couple tiles. If you're doing a room or 2- go rent a power scraper. Not the one on a long handle- [though that might do it & you can get a HF for about $100 if you have a honking compressor] this one looks like a drum sander. Ask your rental place. You'll spend more time getting it set up than using it-- it is that fast.
Jim
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On 8/12/2010 11:54 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Thanks, I'll look into it.
The current plan is annoying, I'm reminded of the advice my Dad gave me about stripping wallpaper with the kerosene steamers, and that was to get shit faced drunk first!
Jeff

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Unless you are putting ceramic tile down, I would leave the floor if its tough to take up. When I did my basement a few years back, the existing linoleum tile showed no signs of coming up without a battle, so I just layed the new linoleum right over it
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Mikepier wrote:

Good thought. The only reason to remove linoleum is if you want to sell it on Craigslist or something.
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On 8/12/2010 4:26 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Unfortunately it has to come up to fix some flooring issues.
Jeff
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Jeff Thies wrote:

Does it ALL have to come up? I've seen spot patches done through old vinyl or asbestos tile, then the repaired area is shimmed up to level with wood or leveling compound. Most common is pop off any loose or curled tiles, and them use leveling compound on the holes.
--
aem sends...

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He has already started, so your advice is no good.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

If he kept the pieces, he can glue them back...
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On 8/12/2010 7:02 PM, HeyBub wrote:

That, would be like a jig saw puzzle! When I laid the tile years ago, I never ran it under the cabinets, I would have had to buy more tile!
I think the lesson is: No more tile.
Jeff
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...or run it under the cabinets.
I wouldn't have anything other than tile in wet areas, anymore.
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Is it somehow important to you to remove those old VCT floor tiles in one piece...
Go rent a power floor scraper from your local rental place...
Removing old glued down flooring is a messy process, doing it the way you are doing is dangerous as you could easily burn yourself with the iron, the freshly removed tile or the spot on the floor where you just removed the tile from...
Plus you are either bent over or on your knees while doing it your way... With a stand-up or walk-behind power floor scraper you will be able to remain standing...
Like others have said, it will take you longer to go get the machine and set it up than it will to actually scrape off the floor...
~~ Evan
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