removing tree stumps

Page 3 of 3  
puttster wrote:

1. You don't have to drill everything away, just enough to make it a breeze to chop to pieces with an axe.
2. If it takes one minute per hole, you're using the wrong bit. Get a decent auger bit, and, oh, battery-powered drills need not apply for the job.
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I shoveled and cleaned a 18 inch stump once then spent time every evening chaisawing at the thing. by nite 4 it was a goner and I covered it with dirt.
stump was cut flush with ground, I wanted it to disappear since I was selling the house
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The last stump I removed was done this way. I first dug out a "ramp" under the main saddle of the root ball. I then slid a 1' x 2' chunk of 3/4" plywood down the "ramp" and rolled my floor jack down on the plywood under the root saddle. I then jacked the stump out. Block it up when you reach the jack's limit, move the jack in the direction of the 'resisting' roots. Repeat as needed.
Bob
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My vote is for stump grinding since it is fast and relatively hassle free. The only caveat is that there may still be roots or stump still in the ground if the grinder doesn't go deep enough. This can be a problem later if you want to build on the area or pour concrete there. Over time the underground stump will rot and the ground will sink.
John Churchill Builder and Cont. Ed. Instructor at Emory University Author of www.renovation101.com
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can a stump grinder be used safely on a 20 or 30 degree decline, in a muddy environment? No grass is planted yet
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If is is really that steep and muddy then the answer is maybe not. It would make it a lot more difficult and dangerous. An exerienced and determined operator might be able. You are probably over stating the actual slope. If it is that steep then you will have problems with any type of landscaping. Yes, a floor jack is a car jack.
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I haven't done the math, but going out 5 feet is a decline of 2 feet. This results in a slope of 21 degrees if my trig is correct.
Many places is steeper (going out 3 feet could be decline of 1-2 feet in some places). This slope is about 18-33 degrees, in other places go out 10 feet and go down 5 feet, this slope is 26 degrees.
This assumes all the trig I learned to become an engineer has actually stayed with me 15 years later. Who wouldathunk?
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OK then. I myself would be hesitant to try a any type of grinder on such a slope even though is may be possible. Better to try one of the other excellent suggestions.
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Not with me using it.

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is a floor jack a car jack or something else?
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It is like the ones at the garage. They roll it under the car, and jack up the car by pumping the handle up/down.
Bob
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it is a jack with wheels on it, like they use in garages

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