Removing rust stains in toilet

Anyone have any favorite methods of removing rust stains/streaks from toilet bowls? I tried Sno-Bol and Clorax and Lysol toilet cleaners and those toilet 'scrubbers' on a plastic handle with little or no success. I'm tempted to try an SOS pad but it probably would ruin the toilet. I've read lemon juice and borax works and will pick up some borax next time I'm in town, probably tomorrow, and try it.
Any other suggestions? I have a septic tank so must be careful what I use.
Wonder where this is coming from? It only recently started. Water from the faucets seems clear. I'm on well water in an agricultural area. Maybe the toilet tank? If so, anyone have a good way to clean it out?
TIA
--
Every silver lining has a cloud.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dissolved iron appears to be the commonest cause of rust stains on plumbing. Hardware stores sell rust remover chemicals.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 17:43:11 +0000, Ken Knecht wrote:

I have had good luck with a product called "Rust Out". Same company also makes "Yellow Out" to remove dinginess from clothes washed in rusty water.
While you are cleaning the bowl, you may wish to clean out tank. You might be surprised how dirty that reservoir can become over time. I just cleaned out one in a cabin recently acquired. The Rust Out did marvels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you think you've exhausted the possibilities on the grocery store shelves, try a janitorial supply house for something with some real muscle. Also, you're smart to go after the root of the problem, too. In an agricultural area, it is common for mega-farm operators to irrigate without regard to the underlying acquifer's sustainable capacity, resulting in severe loss of water quality for well owners for miles around. It would be prudent to have your water tested and well level checked on a much more frequent basis to monitor any possible such changes. Your well service professionals will then be avle to assist you in whatever treatments seem necessary.. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 15:48:22 -0700, Joe wrote:

A reminder that some chemicals will actually etch the porcelain. Pay a little extra and get what is appropriate for your problem.
If the porcelain becomes etched, there's not much else you can do.
Of course, this may be your chance to get a "green" toilet and save some water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Knecht wrote:

Iron Out works well. We have septic too. Moderate amounts of all these type cleaners have not bothered it.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Muratic acid worked wonders for my vintage 1950 toilet. Looked like new I was done. Stuff from the grocery or department stores was too week for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

Sounds dangerous to use with a septic tank?
--
Every silver lining has a cloud.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

This is my second response. I didn't see yesterday's today.
I've used this in town where I didn't have a septic tank - works extremely well. But I am afraid it would kill the bacteria in my septic tank this time.
--
Every silver lining has a cloud.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Knecht wrote:

If you would like to try something relatively nontoxic, go to the grocery store and take a look at the coffee pot cleaners, find one that is citric acid. Same stuff as in lemonade mix, etc. I have had good luck removing iron stains with it. -- H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Iron Out tablets for your tank lasts 30 days+
CathyLee

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had unbelievable stains in a toilet that I coudn't get out with chemicals. After trying several different things (CLR, Rust-Out, etc.), I went at it with a pumice stone, figuring I would ruin the porcelain and need to replace the toilet. I removed the stains (probably significnatly "loosened" chemically) and had no visible damage to the toilet. I was very gentle with the pumice stone, and the rust seemed to just come right off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 19:20:45 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

My solution was to first scrape crisscross lines into the stain using a fork or something similar. Then I use fine wet and dry sandpaper to abrade off the stain. If the sandpaper is fine enough it will "polish" the ceramic surface. The initial scraping gives the sandpaper something to "bite" on. I don't have enough strength to scratch the ceramic surface with the fork.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As others have said use "Iron out".
Iron out is powder. Wet the side wall of the bowl and then throw a light coat of the powder around the surface. Let it set for a while.
Caution: Do not breath the fumes!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.