Removing Rotted Wood, and Re-Filling Areas: What To Use ?

Hello:
Have several spots (a few inches x a few inches) in some 3/4 plywood flooring that has rotted, perhaps half way thru, due to water leakage.
Would like to chisel out the rotted portions, and re-fill them with some type of compound that when sets up, would set up hard. Would then re-sand the spots to refinish the floor flat.
Is there anything appropriate for this ?
Don't really want to use epoxy, as I doubt that I could ever sand it smooth once hard.
Thanks, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is a dry mix putty that works well, called *somebody's* Water Putty. I think it is acrylic, and inexpensive, easy to mix with water, and will not shrink upon drying. It also sands easily, and is strong. I've used it to fill rotted parts of siding, first chiseling out all rot, spraying with Jasco preservative, drying out, then applying water putty.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty is as good as you can get. Joe Arnold
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Depending on exactly where it is at, I would worry about just filling in that part of the floor. If it is going to be subjected two weight, you may find it giving way at a rather poor time. The patch will not be nearly the strength of the original and while the lower portion may seem solid, it has been subjected to water and it is not likely to be in good shape itself.
If at all possible I would suggest replacing the damaged sheets.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.