Removing Rain-X from car windshield

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On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 07:52:16 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Nope, I choose to use some vinegar in the water instead. Cleans well for me and cheaper too. As for freezing temps, where I am, we don't get much less than 32 most winters.
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It's not about the temperature or the cleaning. It's about the Rain-X mixture that eliminates the need to use the wipers at speeds over 40 MPH.
Some things I'm willing to pay a little extra for. Rain-X infused washer fluid is one of them. There were 5 gallons of the stuff under the Christmas tree this year, one for each driver, and another gallon purchased for the extended-family's session of the White Elephant game.
However, I do use vinegar and water for all other window cleaning, not only for the inside and outside of my cars, but also throughout the house.
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Bull.
I (and my entire family of 5 drivers) have been using the orange windshield washer fluid that is mixed with Rain-X in all of our cars for years.
Above 40 MPH I never even use my wipers unless there's traffic with lots of road spray. In that case, I use the slowest intermittent wiper speed since the dirty road spray doesn't tend to bead up like the nice clean rain water.
Perhaps it's the frequent re-application since we'll typically spritz the windshield quickly when it starts to rain, but we've never had any chattering of wipers or any other wiper related problems associated with the product.
The one issue we've found is the brief period of fogging if the windsheild is cleaned with the sun shining directly at the windshield, such as when sunrise and sunset causes sun glare. It takes a few swipes of the wipers to clear the fog but that disadvantage is far outweighed by the advantage of not having to use wipers the vast majority of time.
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I'm talking about PURE Rain-X.
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http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Windshield-Wiper-Blades-from-Squeaking
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5-7 years???? Here in FL I have to replace mine every six months because the sun dries them out.
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wrote:

I think they recommend around where I am in Texas every inspection or once a year. To be honest, 6 months doesn't sound like a bad idea because like you, we get hot in the summer too. If you buy good blades you can get past a year but I think I like the idea of frequent changes tho it costs (depending on how you look at this cost).
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In article

Solar radiation exposure is a leading cause of rubber product deterioration. Different types and blends do vary a good bit in their resistance.
In the case of wipers, the wiper 'park' position and arm design are one factor; some 'shade' the rubber components better than others.
Probably even more important is where the individual vehicle 'specimen' is normally parked. Wiper daily average direct sun exposure times range from some hours a day to nearly zero...
It's easy to understand how people, even living in the same household, can experience greatly varying wiper life.
Erik
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wrote:

Never did, but I'll try it next time they start streaking. Been paying 12-15 bucks each for the ones I've been using. They last 2-3 years, depending. What do use to clean them?
--Vic
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rubbing alcohol
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wrote:

Somebody else said rubbing alcohol. How's it work with just washing fluid? I use that often anyway, out of the spritzers. I'm not getting this. Seems the rubber wiper edges would have to get reconditioned somehow to go evenly along the glass again, and not streak.
--Vic
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I said to use rubbing alcohol. As a matter of fact some of the wiper blades I've bought had a alcohol wipe included.
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wrote:

I'll give rubbing alcohol a try next time the blades give me trouble.
--Vic
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So, with all the different sized wipers available based on year/make/ model and driver/passenger side, you were able to find a pair of wipers in the garbage that not only fit your car but were still in good enough shape to last 2 years?
Color me skeptical.
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Thanks for everyone's tips to remove it.
I understand what you're saying about the water beading up..... outside....
But that leaves a question. What does the Rain-X do, *which is made for the inside of the windshield*?
My reason for trying it was to make it easier to remove frost in cold weather. Aside for that, there is no real reason for it.
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On Feb 6, 10:57pm, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Did you not read my post?
Rain-X Anti-Fog......it keeps the windshield from fogging up. Does it work...I dunno. I used it years ago and it didn't. I have a bottle sitting in my garage that someone gave me a few months ago, but haven't used it yet.
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Spray paint the inside window yellow, then use a razor blade.
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The "universal solvent" to eliminate windshield smearing used to be Coca Cola. It contains a weak acid.
Just sayin.
Tomsic
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...
The "universal solvent" to screw with people you didn't like used to be Coca Cola. It contains a weak acid. Very bad for automobile paint.
Just sayin.
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On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 08:07:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I thought that was brake fluid not coca cola ????
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