Removing Quarry Rock from Block Wall

Our house was built in the early 80's. The "style" in the area was the corners of the garage, the section wall on the front of the house, and the light post near the front door were all done with this rustic quarry rock that was concreted right to the block wall. We're looking at some redesigns but this was one of the sticky points.
We were wondering since it's rock concreted to concrete block, if we try to remove the rocks will we end up destroying the underlying block as the concrete used to hold the rock on might be stronger then the concrete of the blocks themselves?
Anyone got any hints or tricks for doing this?
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Your description of the construction of the "rock and concrete block" is not clear. It probably is stone veneer, 4 to 5" thick, tied to the blocks with metal ties the same way that bricks are attached. The stone may be real, or it may be moulded concrete. Or the stones may be thin "stick on" cast stone shapes that are stuck into a mortar base. There are many variables that are used or could have been used and the removal methods will vary. Also what is above or adjacent to the stone that could be affected by the removal?
The answer is in the details you supply we can't see it from here. Also what country are you in, construction techniques vary by country and region.

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The stone is real, not thin or stick on. I had one fall off on the big square lamp post out front, I think some kid kicked it off on Halloween a few years back. It left a big socket where it was. The exterior wall is basically concrete block, then there is what appears to be concrete used as mortar to stick the stone directly on to the block wall. This is close to what the stone is like (but it's not this fancy a home and our stone was more random sizes and shapes, not real uniform sizes) :
http://www.buildingstonemagazine.com/summer-06/art/ThinStone15.jpg
Not really worried about what's beside the stone as it's all rough lumber siding that we're replacing. We're worried if we break the stone off the wall it will leave the concrete "sockets" behind where the stone was. When we try to break this concrete off the face of the block, will it damage the underlying block? It just seems if the concrete behind and around the stones is stuck well to the block, what says that breaks off rather then the block breaking? The house was built aroun 1982 so it's been there a while.
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The post had a concrete block core, that is expected. I doubt the house is concrete block, especially with wood beside the stone. I think it is a wood frame house with the stone veneer as a feature. It will be installed just like brick is, and not attached to the house except by metal ties about every 2 feet or so. The veneer should peel off quite easily.

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I would suggest trying a small (Hilti TE-54 or smaller) variable speed electric hammer
(one that has rotary hammer & hammer only settings)
in hammer only mode with a flat wide (2" to 4") chisel blade.
Use "little hammer" setting & gently chisel under rocks at a very flat angle.
They should pop right off & you should be able to get rid of the majority of the cement / mortar that adheres them. Finish off with angle grinder & a cupped diamond disc.
Mortar / cement has relativley low bond / tensile strength so "wedging it off" will work.
If the block is sound you should be able to remove the rock with virtually no damage to the block.
If the stone was set with metal ties you'll have to be a little more careful but it will still be doable. Use a 4.5" angle to attack the ties as they become accessible.
How many sq ft?
cheers Bob
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NEW TOYS!!! :O) I think I can snag one of those. I do have a decent compressor, would a pneumatic hammer be cheaper?

Already got the grinder. I had one pop/fall/get kicked off already. But the back concrete looked solid.

I have a lamp post by the front door that's block and about 18" square and has the stone on it. We're replacing that and my GF suggested we use that as a test area but I wanted to ask around first. Didn't want to just get in there and start hammering away.

Sounds good. Would like to give the whole house a new look. And getting rid of the stone allows us to do siding all the way around.

Don't think this is an issue but I can check.

Not sure exactly but both sides of the garage door have it, probably 3- feet wide and 8-feet tall and then wrap around the edges about a foot. Then there is a wall section to the left of a bedroom window in the front that has it, probably 10-feet wide and 8-feet tall and wraps around the corner about a foot. Deed restrictions were that front of homes needed to be brick, stone or wood. So this stone trim has rough lumber siding between the stone sections but the sides and rear of the house are painted stucco. Not sure if we want to undertake removing all the stucco.
Can you put siding over top of stuccoed walls if the stucco was ground pretty flat?
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NEW TOYS!!! :O) I think I can snag one of those. I do have a decent compressor, would a pneumatic hammer be cheaper?

Already got the grinder. I had one pop/fall/get kicked off already. But the back concrete looked solid.

I have a lamp post by the front door that's block and about 18" square and has the stone on it. We're replacing that and my GF suggested we use that as a test area but I wanted to ask around first. Didn't want to just get in there and start hammering away.

Sounds good. Would like to give the whole house a new look. And getting rid of the stone allows us to do siding all the way around.

Don't think this is an issue but I can check.

Not sure exactly but both sides of the garage door have it, probably 3- feet wide and 8-feet tall and then wrap around the edges about a foot. Then there is a wall section to the left of a bedroom window in the front that has it, probably 10-feet wide and 8-feet tall and wraps around the corner about a foot. Deed restrictions were that front of homes needed to be brick, stone or wood. So this stone trim has rough lumber siding between the stone sections but the sides and rear of the house are painted stucco. Not sure if we want to undertake removing all the stucco.
Can you put siding over top of stuccoed walls if the stucco was ground pretty flat?
Clearly this is a learn as you go type of thing. If you are dedicated you will find solutions as you go along. Sounds like you will be able to pop off the stones and be left with the mortar and some ridges you can knock off with a chisel or angle grinder. A diamond blade in a circular saw can be used to dice up the stucco for removal if you desire to (cut wet).
No matter what you will need to cover up whatever you get with siding, a new skim coat of stucco or a new veneer.
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Along that line, if we remove the stone and then decide to put siding up, we might opt for siding all the way around. Can you grind stucco down flat and do siding directly over top of it or do you have to remove the stucco completely before mounting siding???
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