Removing part of one truss, temporarily


Removing part of one truss, temporarily.
Even if the roof were to sag when one section is out, can't it be lifted up again and then the truss repaired, or some other method used to put the sagging part back where it belongs?
I'm not likely to want to do this, but I wanted to plan for it anyhow.
My pitched, shingled roof is held up with trusses. My townhouse is about 22 feet wide and the trusses are every 24 inches.
Like most, they are made of 2x4s, arranged in the shape of a triangle, inside of which is an inverted W.
I currently see no evidence of roof-sagging. I want to install some things, including a tv antenna, channel 7 and up, that might not fit between the trusses, unless I cut out 5 or 10 inchess, not the outside triangle, but one part of one piece of the inner W.
I could probably replace it right afterwards, with a sister 2x4 on the side maybe, or if not, on the bottom and/or top
Even if the roof were to sag when one section is out, can't it be lifted up again and then the truss repaired, or some other method used to put the sagging part back where it belongs?
Thanks.
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Why would you even risk such a thing for a TV antenna and "some things"?
You can't just go whack up a truss and stick it back together so it looks good & strong even if everything goes well.
First person down the road like a potential buyer, home inspector, etc is going to want to see is the paper from the PE with the repair spec, signature and PE stamp.

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IF you do go ahead with this, why not put the sister in place before you cut the truss support? You could put new supports in that would clear the antenna and then cut out the existing lumber that is in place.
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Hey, why not whack up the antenna and sister it back together with dowels and duct tape?
Could even use some cardboard and duct tape to make gussets.
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Red Green wrote:

That would be my cho8ice. If the antenna is tubular, insert a dowel to join the two pieces together. If solid, wrap a piece of solid materia over the two halves or put a piece of tubing over the top of them for the splice.
As for removing the truss, it is very possible you can make the cuts and do hte patch and not have any movement at all, but I'd still not chance scewing around wiht something like that. It can bite you in the ass down the road.
OTOH, the only stations worth watching are on cable. Discovery, History Channel, TLC, Science, etc.
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wrote:

Actually, the Winegard HD7695P and 6P do come in two pieces. The front half of the beam gets inserted in the rear half and screwed together. That should make it easier to install also.

Okay, you have a point, as does Red regarding the home inspector.
The thing is, everytime I figur out how to install one antenna, I start asking myself if there is room for the next size bigger. But I just noticed that though the 7694P, 5P, and 6P are all no more than 36" wide, it jumps up to 54" for 97P and 98P

I agree. Well, I think so. Since I don't have cable I'm just guessing. :) But over the air now here now has Retro TV, with reruns from the 50's through the 70's, and THIS, with mostly old action movies, plus SeaHunt and Mr. Ed. Seahunt is surprisingly good, but I still don't like Mr. Ed. (the shows change when they run out of episodes, and that doesnt' take too long at 5 episodes a week. It's not like MASH where they show it over and over and over. :) )
Thanks to all of you.
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If you do cut and then rejoin the antenna elements, make sure they have good electrical connections.
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wrote:

Just 6P does.
5P and 6P both have the rear element folded the opposite direction.

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mm wrote:

They sound like very valid reasons to stay off the roof. Last time I was on mine was 2001. Next trip will be: never.

If need be, you can get Monk on DVD. I like the final show though, one of the best in a while.
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wrote:

I went up 3 times 3 years ago when the guy was replacing the roof, and it wasn't bad. I was sure-footed. And I saw where he put sheetmetal over a couple damaged sheets of plywood, no extra charge, looked very nice. But he had an even longer ladder that went 3 feet above the roof, much easier for going back down.

I guess I missed it, but this channel does show reruns, I think. And if not, thanks for letting me know aobut the DVD.
I was all ready to buy the antenna last night when I saw they also had FM antennas for 20 dollars and if I buy at the same time, I'll save 6 dollars on shipping. So now I need to decide if I'll hook up an FM antenna if I buy one.

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What are other people doing? Please don't tell me that everyone has to chop a hole in their roof and remove a truss to watch channel 7 ? Check other alternatives. If you factor in time any money on what you'll spend on materials, you may be able to buy a more compact gadget/antenna to acheive the same results at the same cost.

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Danimal wrote:

I'm going to patent a new concept. Attach the antenna to the chimney on the roof. Why didn't someone think of that before.
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I mounted my UHF TV antenna on a plumbing vent. I cut the vent pipe inside the attic and spliced in a "T". The cable goes in the side of the "T" and then up through the roof. Dont forget to seal around the cable oryou will get sewer gas in your attic.
Jimmie
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Great idea
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 05:55:31 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

I like that! It shows imagination.
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the roof weill atenuate / decrease signal a lot.........
outside will be far better. plus you probably cant rotate or move the antenna in the attic much..........
having had inside antennas before, and noted the digital signals seem to be hurt more by passing thru buildings
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 10:58:14 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Thanks, I know, but I've done my research and this is it.
I forgot to say to Red that one person gave good advice. Get the antenna and later I can get an amplifier.
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