Removing oil stains from bluestone?

I bought an electric chain saw and following instructions I added bar and chain oil. Between cuts I set it down on the sawdust on the bluestone. Then when sweeping up I found an oil spot at each place I set it down. I certainly won't do this again, but the immediate problem is how to clean off the stains. I did some Googling. I got a variety of suggestions. Does anyone have some firsthand experience as to which of these actually work?
Make a poultice: Take your strongest oil remover* mix it with Talc (baby powder). Apply, cover with plastic, do it hundred times. Leave poultice for 24 hours and repeat. It draws the stain out.
* Like the Techniseals product? http://www.techniseal.com/web/product.php?prodID  [The closest place to buy is a 3 hour round trip.]
Try baking soda or powder to absorb it.
When stain is still fresh apply anything absorbent like baking soda, flour, sawdust, salt. After the fact, you can try applying a paste made from baking soda, scrubbing it into the stain, letting it dry in place, then washing it off. Some people have success pouring cola and/or scrubbing with dishwashing detergent. There are probably commercial cleaners available in auto supply stores.
A good scrubbing with a grease cutting cleaner like Simple Green or that orange stuff should take care of it.
Try a bit of peroxide mixed w/ the baking soda - scrub it in & let it sit for a bit. May have to repeat.
Wash with a strong solution of washing soda and hot water. If stain remains, make a paste of 1 pound strong powdered cleaner, 2 cups powdered chalk, and 1 gallon water and cover the stain. Or, cover with a paste made from fullers earth (an absorbent clay used for removing grease from fabrics) and hot water. Leave the paste on overnight. Rinse with clear water. Repeat if necessary.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
P.S. Before jumping on me asking why I was cutting up the logs on bluestone, the answer is I have no choice. The front areaway (where the wood is) is all bluestone. And also all of the backyard, plus it would be a major effort getting the logs from the front to the back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try the methods you have researched...
One or more of them will work...
Next time you need to cut logs, I recommend putting down plastic where you will be placing the oil soaked electric chain saw...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/19/2010 3:09 PM Don Wiss spake thus:

I know from experience what'll work because just today I had to wipe some spilled oil (Watco teak oil) from slate. Just used ordinary paint thinner, and it worked fine. Any equivalent solvent will work (naphtha, turpentine, etc.) Don't use acetone or lacquer thinner--overkill.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think slate is as porous as bluestone. This all soaked in right away.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/19/2010 5:51 PM Don Wiss spake thus:

I'd still try solvent. You may still have to use one of those other methods of attack you found, but it will definitely not hurt to try to sop up some of the oil with paint thinner or equivalent.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/19/2010 6:09 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

I used cat litter to soak up motor oil from concrete...worked very well. Spread it on, mash it in with your foot, and let it soak for a couple of days. Sweep it up, hose off the dust that remains. Repeat if still stained.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It might never come out except with time, you could treat the whole floor with a treatment for bluestone, then it will all match
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Without any personal experience in this exact situation, I wonder whether a small amount of diatomaceous earth might be worth applying to the stain areas. It's pretty spectacular stuff - kind of like kitty litter on steroids.
Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/21/2010 10:11 AM Arthur Shapiro spake thus:

I wonder; I know it's great as an insecticide for certain species, but that's because it contains microscopically-sharp surfaces that cut the bug's exterior. Not sure how absorbent the stuff is. Cat litter might actually be better; I've used that on oil spills (on concrete) and it works pretty well.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 21 Oct 2010, snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

Hi Art,
Diatomaceous earth is what my father used 50+ years ago, back when he was purchasing agent for a machine shop like factory. I decided to go for the Techniseal Professional Grade Oil & Grease Remover that I mentioned in my original article. Problem is no one sells it near me, and landscape and stone places don't ship. So I found a place near my father. He is on his way to buy a quart and send it to me.
I have also bought a 3 mil plastic sheet to put down before continuing on the project. Thanks to Evan for that suggestion.
Adding in the $24.95 for the Oil & Grease Remover I am now over $100 spent on my "free" firewood. And that doesn't include an extension cord. For the first pass I put four a/c extension cords together. At least I will have a chain saw handy for the next tornado that blows through my Brooklyn neighborhood.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don, I hope you'll report back on the success/lack of success of this product. The general problem is something a lot of us face from time to time.
Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.