removing lime stains from a concrete floor

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.
That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but is unsightly.
My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the cement in the floor.
Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?
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Matt wrote:

Phosphoric acid.
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This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious when taking advise from newsgroups: 1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in some versions of Lime Away, which means that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away instead of Lime Away. 2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for etching (eating) concrete. Duh.
Matt wrote:

Phosphoric acid.
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Gideon wrote:

<'helpful' top posting corrected>

Clean it, rinse it. Duh. Phosphoric should be considered before muriatic for grout or concrete cleaning because it is LESS harmful. Duh. Get real. Duh. Easiest and safest for the OP to just use the Lime Away. Duh.
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Gideon wrote:

I have seen phosphoric eat holes in concrete floors.
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Matt wrote:

Yeah, so? I've seen what it does to human teeth left in a glass of cola before too. bfd. What do *you* suggest genius?
The OP's not going to get that efflouresence/lime staining cleaned up off of the concrete without a product that's going to etch, yes ETCH the concrete *SLIGHTLY*. That's a fact and that's reality. That's not to say he'll have holes in his slab or pits in it as you and the other dimwit would have him believe. Phosphoric used properly or in pre-mixed products such as Lime Away will clean the concrete and not harm it, and with less potential harm than muriatic or other acid cleaners.
Like the other dimwit you're quick to reply with no advice. Get real. Duh.
-end of subject-
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G Henslee wrote:

I am the OP.

The thread probably would have been improved had your first reply been a complete sentence.

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.

==========> Yes and that Coke Cola will eat completely thru a carsfender given enough time...Most chemicals have traids that are very useful ..the trick is in knowing how to use them... Coke Cola does taste good...luck for our stomachs that the human body can neutralize it ....(in most cases)...

==========> I agree Bob Griffiths
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Yep.
======
Gideon wrote:

I have seen phosphoric eat holes in concrete floors.
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wrote:

ANything that attacks the lime stains is going to attack the floor too... Do it it small increments, or use sandpaper on it and then paint.
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wrote:

Try scrubbing with white vinegar first. If that doesn't do the trick, I think I'd give citric acid a try before moving up to anything stronger.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Doug,
Your advise is very sound.
Both citric acid and vinegar are good suggests - slower but safer than other methods. The fundamental problem is the fact that the acids which will attack calcium or magnesium deposits will generally also attack the concrete. I'd follow your advise and use something mild and accelerate its action with a brush, followed by a good rinse.
Of course, a painted floor with good paint-concrete adhesion will greatly mitigate the danger of concrete etching. Hopefully the OP has a well painted floor, in which case he has little concern.
Gideon
Doug Miller wrote in message ...
wrote:

Try scrubbing with white vinegar first. If that doesn't do the trick, I think I'd give citric acid a try before moving up to anything stronger.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Gideon wrote:

Unfortunately, the floor is unpainted.
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you might try a high alkaline solution. this seems to work on cleaning grout fairly well without damaging the grout. Check for an aquamix product called heavy duty tile cleaner/stripper I think is the name. It clearly states, "High Alkaline" solution on the back. As always, test in an inconspicuous area if possible. Cheers, cc

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Lime is itself alkaline, so this will be no more effective than water.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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