Removing large mirror glued to wall.


Friend has a house with a large (6' wide X 4.5' high) glued to one wall. How to remove with least danger and a reasonable cost?
TIA
Lou
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A mirror guy may use suction cups. still a chance of breaking it. -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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It is probably glued to the wall. Remove any top and side clips. This deal may take 3 people. Get a wire started behind the mirror, wrap each end around a stick, saw back and forth while the 3rd person pulls and balances.
--
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DanG
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The original OP did not indicate whether he wanted to save the mirror or not. When I tried this on a 3'x3' vanity mirror it would not work. I had hopes of initially saving the mirror. The adhesive just got hot and gummy and when I would stop the stuff would cool and somewhat reseal itself so that the wrire kept jamming. The mirror edges were beginnig to show wear marks. I finally decided that $40 for a new mirror was not so bad after all. I taped the mirror with masking tape, put on some safety glasses, heavy gloves, and a long sleeved sweatshirt, and covered the sink with towels to protect it. I used a hammer to break up the mirror.
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I did this in my mother's house. She had 3 mirrors, 6' x 2'. They were glued to a concrete block wall that was topcoated with plaster. I used a very large spatula to go behind the mirror and break some of the glue. The spatula had a 18" blade. The job took some time and I did put a few scratches in the back side of the mirror silver, however, unless you knew where to look, you'd never find them. I re-installed the mirror in another apartment and even had a 4th one made to make it look right on the new wall. The old wall had to be scraped, plastered and sanded. Lot's of work, but it all came out ok in the end.
Lou wrote:

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imho:
I would assume either breakage will happen, accidently or on purpose. So try to prevent the glass from going everywhere. I might try and use contact cement spray and sheet of 6 mill to appy to the glass. This way you can keep your mess down.
Don't forget glasses, gloves, long sleeve shirts, shoes, etc. Keep save.
Just thinking out loud....
tom @ www.YourMoneyMakingIdeas.com
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I had to remove two mirrors of about the same size from a master bath remodel. Because of location, I couldn't get anything behind the mirrors so I just vented all my frustrations out on them. I would figure that I ran up a sizable number of years of bad luck (7000 or so) but what the heck, how often do you get to intentionally break mirrors?
I taped moving blankets to the face of the mirror and used a sledge hammer. That broke up most of the pieces but you will still have to deal with the areas where the glue was positioned. Wear good boots preferably with steel toes because the glass is going to try and get your feet. The cost is nothing as long as you are not trying to salvage the mirror. Wear gloves for the cleanup. I took them both out without a scratch and didn't cost a cent.
Lou wrote:

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