Removing Home Heating Oil From Tank


Appealing to the collective wisdom out there: Someone I know has converted from oil to gas and has 1/4 tank of oil available in a basement tank. I would like to take it. How do I get the oil safely out of this tank and into mine? Thanks.
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Buckets?
You can probably disconnect the oil line from where it was connected to the furnace, and using the existing valve to control the flow drain it via gravity into a tray or shallow pail, and pour the pails into some larger buckets or gerry cans that you can use to transport the oil to your house. Then pour it into yours. Might take a while to move 50 or 100 gallons that way but at $2 a gallon it's probably worth the time.
Just be very neat, and make sure you can control the flow with a valve before you disconnect anything.
--

Mike S.

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Except that his friend can sell the oil to an oil company for I think 1.50 or more a gallon. I'm pretty sure they don't even go into the house.

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pump it directly out a window into a tank or drum in a pickup truck or trailer. You can buy them but then you're reducing the value of the oil, although I have an uncle who picks up several gallons of oil every year by letting it be known around town that he will take it for the hauling. Of course, he sometimes has to agree to haul the old tank out of the basement, too. That can be a real chore. Pumping oil should be a pretty safe proposition since it isn't nearly as flammable as gasoline. Tom G
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Call your local anti-poverty agency (often called a Community Action Agency or an Economic Opportunity Agency) and ask for their Weatherization program. Often they will come and remove the oil from a tank for free and then give it to a low income family in need.
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if the tanks in great shape add it to your home if you have the space. buy oil when price is down:)
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" snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" wrote:

Just remember that there are limits to the total tank capacity allowed in a single fire rated space. Last time I looked in one location it was 660 gal. past that you needed to make a separate fire rated space to get more capacity.
Pete C.
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An electric fuel pump from an old Volkwagen beetle works nicely. A new one should cost around $35 and it's kind of a handy thing to have around when you need one.
-rev
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