Removing Gunk from Fuel Tank

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wrote:

Highly unlikely, especially for a generator tank, and irrelevant to his situation, where the gravel is needed to scour the gunk out once the solvent softens it.
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It's a metal tank. It says USMC on the bottom and it looks like something you'd see strapped to the bumper of a Land Rover in a movie. I was about to try whatever solvent I have with either clean gravel or a handful of nuts and bolts when I found out that the one radiator shop that does this kind of work was open and willing to squeeze me in. Apparently this guy does a lot of this and the others just send everyone to him. He got every bit of gunk and rust out of it. He showed me a motorcycle tank in the same condition.
Still on generator power here. Most of the neighborhood is up but if I follow our line I quickly come to a pole that is down with the wires laying on a chain link fence. They are working on things that affect the most people first. With 250,00 still out as of last night I'm thinking I shouldn't hold my breath.
I probably should start a new thread for this but I'm really surprised that this old machine is standing up to this much usage. My father let it sit for 28 years, then I changed the oil and rebuilt the carb., started it once, and let it sit for 2 more years. It has a pneumatic valve that feeds oil from a large external tank when it gets low and is labeled an 'extended service' unit - 'Sears Best'. I do want to find out if modern generators burn less fuel - 3500 watts/ half a gallon per hour - and how much quieter they are these days. The neighbors probably have a contract out on me from the noise this sucker makes. And so help me, when things get back to normal I am going to figure a way to extract fuel from my old vehicle - 96 explorer, gets driven once a week and has a full tank. When the whole area goes dark is a damn bad time to start wishing you had taken a few minutes to fill all your fuel cans! If I had money to burn this would be the week I commit to a full solar array on the roof.
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using gravel is a time tested method. Been there, done that dozens of times on small tanks. The old timers used it almost exclusively to clean gas tanks. Judging from who you got that reply from, I'd just ignore it. I do, i have him filtered.
s

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wrote:

No clear answer IS good. Remove tank to a remote location. Pour 1/2 gal of gas in; then safely light the fire and burn inside. Clean with a wash and rinse.
Replace the tank is good.
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laquer thinner will cut the gunk. remove the tank, pot the thinner in it, slosh it around every hour for about 3 weeks and it will come clean as a whistle. OR you could take it to a radiator shop and have them clean it out in the hot tank.
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