Removing glued PVC elbow from pipe

Last night we had our first deep freeze for the season. I forgot to disconnect the PVC pipe in my barn that goes across the ceiling and thru a wall into another part if the barn. This pipe is designed to work in the winter by having a large amount of slope, as long as disconnect all hoses to allow it to drain after using it.
However, in the summer I leave it connected. I did not disconnect it soon enough and although the water was turned off, there was still water in the pipe, and last night it froze and split the top most elbow right in half. The half I found on the barn floor was actually peeled right off the glue joint, leaving half of both pipes clean and ready to glue again. But the other half is still glued to the pipes.
I would like to see if there is a way to neatly pull the other half of this elbow cleanly off the glue so I can install a new elbow without moving pipes or adding couplers and pieces of pipe. In other words, there is really no spare pipe to cut off at the glue ends, unless I tore the whole thing down to adjust the position of the pipes so they are aligned. I'd much rather spend a little time trying to cleanly take off the other half of that elbow than to tear this whole thing apart. Adding couplers and short pieces of pipe are an option, but I like to avoid adding all sorts of extra parts, not to mention I will have to buy a whole 10ft. piece of pipe for 8 inches.
Is there a way to "pick off" the elbow at the glue? Is there any sort of solvent that will help dissolve the glue?
BTW This is ONE INCH PVC.
Thanks
Timothy
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snipped-for-privacy@theoffice.com wrote:

Sorry it is not glued it is one with the pipe. Cut it off and use a coupling or two. That is not glue, it is a solvent.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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wrote:

You can try to repair it but be ready to replace it. Thoroughly clean the half that came off and the pipe it came off of. Use PVC cleaner and then dope the H*** out of them with glue and apply. The fit needs to be tight.
Harry K
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snipped-for-privacy@theoffice.com wrote:
-snip-

I haven't seen them in 1" but I'd try to find one of those soft rubber fittings with worm clamps. [Fernco is what we see in this part of the world- there might be competitors- http://www.fernco.com/QL.html ]
That way, next time you forget or it goes down to 20 in late September- the ice won't break anything.
Jim
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If the glued joints did not take well due to dirt or a poor fit, it is possible to chisel off the remaining pieces. Use a wood chisel and a light hammer and try to get under the couplings to pry them away. Once it is all off, sand the joints down to get all of the rough spots out. Use a pvc cleaner on everything before attempting to glue the new couplings in place. Be sure to apply glue to the couplings and the new elbow when putting them together.
Personally I think that you are better off fitting in all new sections rather than working with the old stuff if it is possible. One length of pvc and a few couplings will only cost a few bucks for piece of mind. Be sure that all joints are clean and free of burrs. Use pvc cleaner on everything and apply glue to all parts.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

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On 11/26/2004 9:01 AM US(ET), John Grabowski took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

just to save buying a 10' piece of 1" PVC which will cost about $2.50.

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There are several "drills" made for your problem. I have also had good luck using a small screwdriver and hammer to chip out the existing pieces, though you must be mentally prepared for this method to not work. Here are some of the drills:
http://www.plumbingstore.com/pvcsaver.html
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Thanks for the advice, and I would like to own one of these things. However, this time I am doing the opposite. In other words, trying to save the PIPE, not the elbow. The elbow is split in half.
I like the idea of that Fernco coupling, and agree that would be a good protective alternative if it ever freezes again. However, I dont think they make them in One Inch size.
Tim

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yes they make them in 1''
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A dremel tool might come in useful in removing that elbow and cleaning up anybits and pieces left on the pipe. > Fernco coupling, and agree that would be a

Why not make your own? Rubber hose and hose clamps. A length of car radiator or heater hose that will fit over the pipe?. create some sort of reducer on the existing pipe end? Or really tighten down the clamp. Cut the pipe with the elbow right at the end of the elbow. Cut a section of "custom' hose that already has a bend,an elbow, and hose clamp it on.?
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go to home depot and get a compression repair fitting . there about 6'' long and have rubber sleeves on both ends .But really it's easier and faster to cut and re-solvent the broken section than what your asking to do.
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Lowes sells short peices of pipe, but it's not much cheaper than a 10'?

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