Removing exterior chimney

Hi guys -
I'm looking for advice on removing an exterior chimney. Currently it is used for a woodburning fireplace, which I want to scrap. The chimney runs up the exterior wall, and is made of a soft brick that is crumbling away. My plan is to eliminate it and have a gas fire instead, which I can then relocate to the other side of the room, and this will allow me to relocate a window or two.
First off I'm trying to figure out what will lie between the chimney and the house. Will it be brick on all four sides, or just the externals? And will there be a framed wall above the opening, ie with a header to support the roof above? I know these are difficult questions to answer speculatively, just wondering if that if anyone can suggest what is most likely.
I plan to start swinging the hammer soon, but wonder what kind of project I will have to make good.
Any insight or other advice on this project that anyone can give will be gratefully received.
TIA
Moo
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Assuming this is a legit question - being posted on April 1st and all!
Try this(assuming also that the house is frame and not masonry to start with): Knock on the inside wall above the fireplace and below the ceiling. Does it sound hollow like an area of the wall away from the chimney or solid like masonry?
If it is hollow, then there is a chance the chimney is built on the outside of the house frame, with an opening thru the wall for the fireplace. In this case you can probably remove the chimney and close in the opening, insulate and reside the outside and your are done.
If it is solid as in masonry, then the house was probably framed up to the masonry chimney. In this case you have a bigger task since it is entirely possible that without a framed wall, the chimney could be a structural part of the house, holding up the 1st floor ceiling rafters, the roof, or the second floor joists. At minimum when it is gone you will have a large hole to frame in and fill.
Bottom line, if you can't tell for sure, you should get a contractor that can. Even then he may need to pop a few holes in the wall and ceiling to see exactly how things were built before he'll give you any idea what it might involve to remove it.
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