Removing electric meter lock ring

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Any idea how to remove this ring?
http://www.inner-tite.com/fering.html
Al
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Big Al wrote:

4" angle grinder with a metal cutoff wheel.
Bob
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I suppose filling in the form for an information request is one way. Stopping payment to the utility company might get the meter removed but they might reuse the lock for the blanking cover on the pan and cut the drop at the pole.
Bill
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Assuming you do mean the ring and not the lock, I too use a 4 inch grinder. The ring is "C" shaped and a little tricky getting the back side. I grind it down, but not through, then use a medium screw driver to chisel it apart. If you cut to deep, you can damage the metal band that holds the glass to the meter or break the glass. Utility companies have a lock breaker for these, but it doesn't always work

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Usually a call to power company gets it removed for me.
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Sort of wanted to get it off without damaging it:) Need to put it back on after I replace the switch in the box below it.
Thanks,
Al
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In that case I'd call the utility company, which won't help if you're not authorized to make such repairs. If that's the case call an electrician

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It partly depends on where you live, I have found. When I had my service upgraded the electrician cut mine off with impunity. He used a large pair of side cutters. A small bolt cutter will do. It passed inspection with no problem. The electric co-op has been on the property since and they don't seem to mind.
So if you are worried then call the company like the others said. But if you are an outlaw then cut that thing off and leave the details for a someone else to worry about.
If you are confronted you can just act stupid. It is very hard to prove someone is not stupid, :)
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Sounds like a legitimate reason to have it removed by the power company. Have you contacted them? I don't know where you live, but in New Jersey there are laws against meter tampering and cutting off the lock may be construed as such.
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Big Al wrote:

We had exactly the same project. Of course we didn't need no stinkin' inspections or permits.*
In my town (Houston), call the light company. Their standard is to remove the ring within six hours after the call. When done with the work, call them back. They'll replace the ring within 48 hours.
Evidently (I don't know for sure), the power company records the reading at ring-removal time and again at ring-replacement time - just to keep you honest.
------- *I always thought our town, with no zoning, was pretty cool. Now I'm convinced.
FEMA delivered six medical trailers, each capable of handling up to nine non-emergency patients simultaneously, to New Orleans a year ago. Plans were to install these trailers at six different schools to provide routine care during the doctor shortage and take the load off the few remaining emergency rooms. LSU is ready to supply physicians, nurses, and support personnel, along with equipment and supplies.
The trailers are still in storage.
They've been waiting for over a year for zoning variances which are expected to become final in the next 60 days.
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them
at
This meter is on a house built in 1949. I'm trying to do some upgrades without opening a large can of worms. The meter and boxes are mounted on wood and the riser has wood blocks between it and the brick wall. All rotten. Might try to just cut the wires to the weather head, make the repairs and reconnect the wires. Was going to remove the meter to kill power so I could replace the cut off switch and fuse box. (Plug fuses.) Don't want to get into rewiring the house. My problem is, what if I have to replace the wires coming out of the meter box. They are a bit short. No way I can get in there without removing the meter.
Al
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remove
power
want
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in
It sounds as though your service needs to be replaced. If you are going to go through all of the trouble to replace the main and fuse box, you could just as easily do the whole service. Do you have any pictures of this project?
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Big Al wrote:

Consider that these are service wires. Aside from shock hazard there is a major hazard from high current in a short circuit. There is probably 5,000-10,000 Amps available for a short circuit - that can make large screwdrivers disappear, depositing melted steel and vaporized copper on you. And there is minimal fusing on the utility side. Special rules apply to installing service wires because of the hazard. Those rules apply through the service disconnect.
Working in a meter socket with the top powered is very hazardous. Resplicing cut service wires at the weatherhead is also hazardous. You particularly don't want an aluminum ladder. The utility will use a 'hi-press' splice - a sleeve with the wires inserted in each end. The sleeve is then compressed at high presure which cold-welds the metals resulting in a very reliable connection. You probably don't have access to this equipment.
Contact the utility and see what is involved in having them cut the wires at the weatherhead and reconnect them. The work may have to be inspected. In some areas that may require an electrician. Having the utility cut and reconnect the wires is by far the best idea. They would also remove the ring. The utility may take a very dim view of you removing the ring without contacting them - it suggests theft.
-- bud--
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I have pulled a few meters, Whats one to do when a fuse falls apart in the main, cant work with it powered on. Pulled meter, did my thing replaced meter, called power company.
they said no trouble as long as you let them know. this was before the remote reading meters.
I think they lose a lot of security, but the manpower savings well they basically dont care........
DO TALK TO POWER COMPANY BEFORE PROCEEDING!
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At least here, those type locking rings are only installed on meters that have shown evidence of tampering. A normal ring just has a light weight one-time snap ring. If you cut it loose for your work, you will get the locking ring. Either way, removal requires the power company. Here they will only work with a licensed electrician.
--
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DanG wrote:

If the utility isn't cooperative with a DIY'er, try your local fire department. They may be willing to help you if you emphasize that you're trying to prevent a fire.
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I have never seen a ring like that. The ones I have seen just have a thin hardened wire with the lead or plastic crimped ID tag. Those are easy to cut and remove. I have removed mine several times to do work on my system. I always planned to tell the power company there was an emergency of some sort or other. However, I just always put the ring back and place the cut tag on the ring "lock". Sooner or later the power company comes out to check the wires or something and I end up with a new "ID lock". I have never been questioned about it.
As to removing that one, I could think of lots of ways to remove it. As others said, and angle grinder. Also, a hacksaw, carbide drill bit thru the lock itself, bolt cutter (maybe), and if you are a real good shot and fit the title of redneck, a rifle would do the job <lol>.
DO NOT try to splice the wires at the head when they are LIVE. Thats crazy. It would be wiser to have a tree suddenly fall from the sky and bust your meter, if you get the hint.
If I was in your shoes, I'd use the angle grinder, hacksaw or drill and make up a story about an emergency. Since you found that website that sells these rings, you could always buy a new one from them too, buy it before you do the job, and maybe even get a key to fit your old one.....
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2007 07:50:42 -0600, paulking@__none__.com wrote:

This looks like a good place to jump in. Some years ago some wit used a plastic pen barrel to open high security hardened steel bicycle locks. (The company had to do a recall and replace with redesigned locks). You might want to do a websearch on this article or video and see if that will work for you.
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Bob wrote:

As one firefighter I hope you find that is bad advice. Any fire service personnel That would help you bypass the security looks on a utility installation need to have their annual medical moved up with a request for a psych evaluation. -- Tom Horne
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If you need it removed, call the electric utility. If you have a good reason, they shouldn't have a problem helping you.
Just a guess.....
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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