removing baseboard without damage

Page 3 of 3  

snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

hmm, my dad got me a Craftsman thing that looks like a Fein Multimaster clone for xmas, maybe I'll get an excuse to use it right away? Maybe channelling plaster might be easier than trying to shave the molding. If you see my other post, I think I can get away from running around the baseboard in the one bedroom; the one that I'd still need to do would involve running it around two walls that are plaster.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

If it works on grout, it ought to work on plaster, but haven't seen real plaster in a long time. You would have it embedded in plaster and then have to patch plaster. Hmm... I don't know the size of the wire you need to run, and I'm not up on big repair jobs .. just the tinkering level. When we moved into our condo, my hubby ran the cable for satellite TV from the satellite in through the patio sliding door, which always kept the door ajar a little bit. There was a hole in the outside concrete block wall and a hole inside same place .. I got a length of stiff plastic tubing to go through both holes, then ran the TV cable through the tubing and pulled the tubing out from the inside when the cable was through.
My hubby is a lot stronger than I so when I want to do something requiring muscle and he isn't around (preferable when I am truly inspired about a task), I need to engineer it. Usually works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hope you put a drip loop on the outside cable where it enters the exterior wall. Just dress the wire to below the hole and then back up and thru the wall and caulk to keep water out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A trim pry bar (Amazon.com product link shortened) 1&pf_rd_i000224TY&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_rYRQ8GD0CWH0ZH6GVBE
Available at all the big box stores.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Basically, it can't be done. The main thing you can do to help is cut the caulk bead if there is one. Then just carefully remove the trim. Use a 3" squar of thin plywood or laminate to put under your pry bar to protect the drywall from dimpling. If a nail wants to go through the baseboard rather than come out, let it and then pull it. Watch out for pipes and mark on reinatall so you don't puncture any.
HTH
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

You sound experienced enough to know you should pry gradually along the length of the part so it doesn't break in the middle. I've used pry bars with a piece of wood behind it to protect the adjacent surface and then pry against that. If you tap the baseboard back on gently with a cushioned mallet, perhaps the nails will be visible from the front. I can't imagine taking it off without some damage to the finish, esp. around nail holes. Could there be glue or caulk between the separate strips that is holding fast?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I just remembered all of the baseboards I have seen (including my present home) that have caulk along the baseboard/flooring joint. Perhaps running a sharp blade along the base will free it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You sound like you are doing what you need to be doing. Just go slow, and make sure that you have cut through the bead, as some places it is much thicker than others. Also, older baseboard is cut fingerjointed. That is like pushing your fingers together. It is weak there, and will usually break there, and in a lot of pieces of baseboard, they used the scraps, so runs of contiguous materials aren't very long.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote the following:

First, with a utility knife, cut along the paint lines between the wall and top molding and between the top molding and baseboard. This will prevent paint chipping along the seams when you pull of the molding. After that, use a flat scraper, the wider the better, to pry the top molding off. Start at each point where there is a finish nail holding the top molding on. Some nails may pull through the molding and remain in the wall, others may just come off with the molding.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

Find a piece of thin strong metal and put it on the paneling to protect it and spread the pressure over a larger area. (The metal in a putty knife is about the thickness and strength you want. Then us whatever you have (the screwdriver will work) to pry the molding out enough that you can get the claw on a claw hammer under it, and use that to pull off the molding.
I like to keep the nails in the molding and just use them and the old holes to reinstall it (use a small piece of hardwood over the molding and pound that, rather than the molding, to preserve the molding); I'm frugal, and I don't like making and fixing extra holes, too.
Doing each nail halfway at a time, then redoing them takes a little longer, but will reduce the risk of breaking the molding. Take care to see how the corners are done. In most situations each leg is cut at 45 degrees, but in better construction one piece is cut square and the other shaped to fit over it; in that case, you would want to remove the shaped piece first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My thought is that leads to a loose fit or one that will work loose, have gaps show up later or crack any caulk that was used between the molding and wall. I've never tried it because of that but I guess it works for you.

coped
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.