removing a wall


Hello -
I want to remove the wall between my kitchen and living room in my craftsman cottage. I have checked the joists in the basement and the run parallel to the wall. Also, this wall is not supported in the basement. I have no access to an attic to check the ceiling joists. Am I safe to assume it is not load bearing based on what I have found in the basement? If not, is there some way to confirm the ceiling joists without having access to an attic?
Thanks!
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Go outside and look at the roof, if you have trusses, you will be able to tell which way they run based on the slope of the roof... You will want the ridgeline of the roof to be perpendicular to your wall. If you have a stick framed roof, you should get in the attic and take a look.
Dave

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Oh that would be such a great suggestion if I didn't have a flat roof. Whoever built my house made some very interesting choices. It resulted in a great looking house but a little bit of a puzzle. While it is apparent that there is some sort of space between the ceiling and the roof - there is no actual "attic" or entrance.
It's frustrating!
Thanks

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No.

A good stud finder and I would back that up by drilling a small hole next to it and use a wire to locate the joist.

--
Joseph Meehan

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wrote:

Just curious, Joseph- based on what the OP says, how could this wall be load bearing?(If it's unsupported below.) I'd agree with you it's a good idea to check it out anyway before proceeding. You thinking there may be cross members spanning basement joists, supporting this wall?
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Sev wrote:

The rule is never assume. In this case what if that wall contained a structural beam supported at either end? Who knows? Which is the point, I don't know and the OP does not.
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Joseph Meehan

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On Feb 13, 5:57 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You are going to be patching the ceiling when you are done anyhow. Cut a small hole, big enough to pass the mirror end of an inspection mirror through. That plus a flashlight shining up onto the mirror should get you a good look.
Harry K
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On 13 Feb 2007 05:57:00 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
I would have to agree with SEV. For it to be a load bearing wall, it would HAVE to be supported from below. You can look in the attic all you want, but for it to support any loads, it would HAVE to bear the weight on something below. It is not a load bearing wall.
I have seen may Sears (craftsman cottage) homes over the years, but yours is the first that I have heard of with a flat roof.
-Lee

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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

That is an assumption. One that will almost always be right. Almost.

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Joseph Meehan

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Lee -
My house is very strange indeed - is it a true sears craftsman cottage? No, it is actually a strange mix of styles but where I live (denver) is most often describe as a craftsman. Picture an interior with all the details, woodwork and built-ins of a craftsman but an outside that matches the late 19th century row homes that it sits along side with a little dash of a art deco exterior details for kicks. It is clearly something that someone built without the aid of traditional plans. We get comments on how unique it is all the time but the flat roof is a pain.
Thanks for everyone's help - it wasn't load bearing at all.
On Feb 13, 10:16 am, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

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On 13 Feb 2007 05:57:00 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You're willing to move an entire kitchen wall, but you're afraid to cut a hole in the ceiling?
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Afraid? I would hardly say so. I was just looking for the least destructive way to go about this because if it was load bearing, we are not doing any to the wall and everything would have stayed as it is. I did end up cutting a hole and no, it isn't load bearing, as I suspected.
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