Removing a pole from basement

Page 2 of 2  
15. snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com Jan 25, 8:34 am Depends if it's done properly. It's not something to do without knowledge and the advice of a structural engineer. The posts are placed in the locations where they are for a reason. When the drunk knocked out the post, that post was right where the wood beam pieces were joined. This is usually the case, unless it's a one piece beam. If it is a one piece beam, a post could be placed a few feet away in both directions, and most likely the existing one safely removed. But if the post is at a point where the beam pieces come together, dont even thing of removing the post. The only way to do it then would be to have professionals replace the entire beam. "
Well duh! You think maybe that's why the OP said he obviously needs a structural engineer? This is not a DIY project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The engineering part is not a DIY project, but if someone is handy, the actual replacement of the beam can be done with a little common sense, keeping safety in mind.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"20. Bob Jan 25, 2:14 pm show options
The engineering part is not a DIY project, but if someone is handy, the
actual replacement of the beam can be done with a little common sense, keeping safety in mind. "
Yes, I agree. The "this is not a DIY project" in my post was copied from a post I was replying to that wound up in the wrong place. It could at least partly be a DIY project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The tricky part is getting the temporary supports in place while the present center beam is removed, then replaced. All that is really needed is a bunch of jacks and some 2 x 12's or whatever is now in place. In new construction, the beam would be lain in recesses made in the foundation. On a retrofit, it may be permissible to have piers build at the ends to carry the load.
Some years ago I helped my stepfather as he raised a floor from two adjoining rooms about 3 feet. Once in position, he took down the front of the brick house and rebuilt that also. This was a row house in Philadelphia ad it was being change from a store-front to a medical office. Neither is a job that I would tackle myself, but he did that sort of thing all the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
X-No-Archive: yes
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it is a help. Your method sounds much easier that what I would have anticipated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bit of a flying-leap, concluding on conclusions, eh?
Might be better to lighten up. More fun.
J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Jan 2006 11:52:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Got it in 1. You need a structural engineer. Your local building department will be able to give you names of some that do work in your area.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Jan 2006 11:52:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

There have been many replies. yet no one asked WHY you need to remove this post? Cant you work around it? For example, if you want a door there, change your plans. A door is only 32 inches wide on the average, so move the door over 32 inches or less if the post was near the edge of the door. If your beam is solid all the way across, you could likely put a post about 38 inches apart on BOTH sides of the door and remove the existing post, but it surely would be easier to just move the door. You should know that whenever you tamper with the house structure. you will get at least minimal plaster cracking and mis-fitting doors upstairs. If you dont do it right, the problems could be much worse, including cracked pipes, roof leaks around flashings, chimney cracking, and more.
Once again, consider all of this before even considering this post removal. I know all of this for fact because I used to rent a very old house and the wooden posts were rotting at the base and had sunk at least 5 inches over the years. The floor was very sagged in one part of the house and the basement stairs were at a noticable angle. The landlord brought over some vinyl for the kitchen and asked if we needed to have it installed, or if we could do it, and said if we did it carefully, he would deduct some rent money. I knew I could do it, and do it well, so I agreed. In the process, I decided to try to straighten out the floors a little. I went in the basement with some heavy duty bottle jacks and some oak 5x5 posts. Initially I raised the floor about 2 inches, and easily. Then the turning got tough. While doing it, one of the original posts fell over. Thats when I cut off the rotted end and put some solid concrete blocks under the post. After that, every day I gave the jacks a few turns, and soon the other post fell out, and I did the same as the other one. After that, I just added shims as it went up.
The problem while doing this, was the doors no longer closed above that part of the house, and I had to keep planing and sawing on them. The worst door had a noticable gap at the top, which I ended up raising the whole door and leaving a wider gap at the bottom. Along with this, there were lots of cracks that developed in the plaster. By the time I was done, I had to do some serious spackling, and replace a piece of the ceiling that was about 3 x5 feet, because the plaster was ready to fall.
When I finished, the sag in the middle of the floor was about 1 inch lower than the outside perimeter of the floor, the steps were darn near straight, and the floor no longer bounced. I was pleased, and so was the landlord, but I worked my butt off. The jacking was not so hard, but all the wall patching, door trimming, window adjustments and so on were a lot of work.
Of course, in this house it was almost a must, because the place was coming close to collapsing in the center.
But if your house is level now, do you really want to do all of this and cause cracks in walls and mis-fitting doors? Just to remove that post will require jacking the beam up at least 1/4", possibly more. Thats enough to strain the plaster and cause doors and windows to get stuck or not close. If you move the post a few feet away, you have to be almost 100% accurate to get the cement footing the exact same height at it was where the post came from.
Either way, you will still experience the cracking and at least a small amount of door issues.
There are ways around this, and that is why you need a professional. At the same time, no matter how careful you are, there will still be some cracks in the walls and door issues.
You wanted thoughts. These are mine !!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.