Removing a cast iron bath tub??

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Yes, that is a major problem with his suggestion. We'll put it down to "design" :).
Harry K
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On Tue, 21 Dec 2010 19:35:08 -0800, Harry K wrote:

Yes, *exactly*. And I've seen lots of baths like that over in England. I've not seen them like that here in the US, but then I've not exactly been paying attention, either :-) It can certainly be done, has been done and is done, and it actually surprised me to find ones that weren't like that.
Yes, you end up with a seam down any exposed sides of the bath, but I don't think it's necessarily intrusive (and doesn't result in sharp edges etc.)
cheers
Jules
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On Dec 21, 6:54 am, Jules Richardson

Forgot to include: I had to reject the first tub/shower unit they delivered because of that. They had ordered the wrong "hand".
Harry K
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The BFH is the way to go. I would try draping the spot you were hammering on in a blanket.
As for recycling it? Until one of those things is removed to outside the house, it is nothing but a big headache. I only salvaged one and will never, ever try to do it again.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

a pickaxe would be a better choice. the point would work far better on brittle objects.
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wrote:

The BFH is the way to go. I would try draping the spot you were hammering on in a blanket. ===================================================== Excellent! Years ago, when in remodeling, we used a sledge & always draped the tub with a tarp. Those tiny pieces are shrapnel when flying. One worker thought it was being a sissy using a tarp. After 9 stitches below his eye, he thought otherwise. He was lucky not to lose his eye.
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Did someone else hit the tub and drive something toward him? When I broke mine up all the shrapnel (mostly just porcelain chips) went into the tub and I was standing outside. I had a wall open so I could start at the end and it came apart in about 15 minutes without me really working that hard. You can see the tub in the lower left.
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/new%20room/original.jpg
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Standing next to the tub "apron or skirt", using a sledge.
I like to think of it just like someone who crawls under a vehicle, only supported by a jack. You'll hear them say " I do it all the time, and I'm still here". Being careless about something, doesn't take bravery or balls.
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wrote:

The BFH is the way to go. I would try draping the spot you were hammering on in a blanket.
As for recycling it? Until one of those things is removed to outside the house, it is nothing but a big headache. I only salvaged one and will never, ever try to do it again.
Harry K
DITTO that..Bust it up with a sledge hammer...
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http://saimarketingvapi.com/images/elastic%20face%20shield.jpg
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wrote:

These folks are overstating the dangers of breaking this up. I did wear real safety glasses when I broke up mine but it was not that exciting. Once I got the first crack in it I just kept gnawing away on the edge so I had small enough pieces to put in a drywall bucket and haul out to the curb. A "scrapper" drove by and hauled the whole mess away within a day. Once you get it started you use a sledge hammer and you don't really hit it that hard. Pretty much you just let gravity swing it. This is over 300 pounds of metal and getting it out on one piece would be very hard. I think mine was set before the walls were framed. It was butt ugly 60s pink with rust spots so saving it was not even considered.
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Not true. Read my other post.
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On Dec 20, 1:35 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

My project replaced the ugly thing with a one-piece fiberglass tub/ shower unit during a remodel. The out/in was accomplished with a chainsaw that pretty well opened the entire wall ceiling to floor to the outside. Two very good tools when remodeling: BFH and a chainsaw (but don't use one in a basement under a fire detector - ask how I know :))
Harry K
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When using a BFH, be aware of your backswing.
Ask my former toilet how I know that.
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I had a piece rocket to the ceiling and knock me out. Do be careful.
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wrote:

How hard are you people hitting this thing? Once I got the first little piece cracked off I was just letting the hammer hit the broken edge. pretty much of it's own weight and palm sized pieces simply dropped into the tub. There were pieces of the finish that spattered off but they were not flying around the room like M16 bullets. I was wearing my safety glasses but I wear them all the time when I am working anyway.
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On Dec 21, 9:57 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Accidents happen. Relating one insstance where it didn't is no proof of anything.
I spent two years busting up the concrete foundation of a schoolhouse. Once, and once only a chip hit my face and broke my glasses. Probably would have lost and eye except for the (non safety) glasses.
Wear safty equipment when busting up anything!!
Harry K
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<...snipped...>

Put on some safety goggles or glasses with side shields and wail away with a sledge hammer, 8-10 lbs minimum. It may take several hits before the 1st piece breaks off, but once one chunk breaks off it will be fairly easy to break up the rest of the tub. No scoring or other cutting will be necessary if it is a cast iron tub.
If by chance you have a steel tub, it will bend or dent when you hit it with the sledge. However, steel tubs weigh a fraction of what CI tubs do (they are much thinner) so it shouldn't be too tough to carry out. If you do have to cut up a steel tub, use a sawzall or angle grinder.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On 12/20/2010 10:26 AM, RubEric wrote:

Personally, i've never been able to break one. (tried twice). But having said that, i know plenty of people on here will say yes, you can break it up with a sledge. So yes, I'd roll it up on its side away from the wall before starting the beating process. Wear safety glasses and ear plugs.
--
Steve Barker
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You can watch the whole thing if you want, but the bathtub fun starts at about 5:00.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrs6nIwZI3Q

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