Removing a cast iron bath tub??

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Remodeling my second floor bathroom will involve removing a large cast iron tub. The tub is probably much too large and heavy to be removed on one piece and will have to be broken up into small pieces.
How do I do that? Is cast iron brittle and easy to fracture with a heavy hammer? Should I score the tub with a diamond saw before I start to beat on it? Is there a danger of the stucco exterior cracking as the result of my hammering??
TIA
Eric
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RubEric wrote:

The tub will shatter. If it does not, use a bigger hammer.
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wrote:

I have a large range of hammer sizes in my tool kit. :)
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Completely disagree. Not a matter of using a bigger hammer, it's a matter of delivering the same energy to a SMALLER contact area. Use one of the older style picks. It doesn't make a lot of flying fragments, and it's very easy to follow the fracture lines around and make big pieces into as small as you choose.
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In article

Just wondering if ones man's trash is another's jewel.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"Always tell the truth and you don't have to remember anything."
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Bill who putters wrote:

Antique claw foot tub, yes, ordinary old enameled cast iron "built-in" tub, no.
Remove the tub from it's position before attempting to break it up, i.e. pull it away fro the walls. Only hammer on it in a horizontal direction i.e. do not hammer downward on it. Reposition the remains as needed to continue the horizontal hammering. Wear full safety goggles (not just glasses), ear protection and full long sleeve clothing as well.
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2010 11:30:35 -0600, Pete C. wrote:

I don't know about jewel, but possibly useful intact - block up the drain and it wouldn't be bad as a livestock trough, say.
When I eventually get rid of one of ours I think it'll go in the shed (with a lid) as a holding tank for rainwater, so I can have some running water up in the adjacent 'shop. That's assuming I can get it out without busting it :-)
Problem with freecycling something like that I suppose is that you don't know that whoever turns up for it is going to be careful removing it from your house :-(
cheers
Jules
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2010 17:42:12 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

Yeah, but how will he get the livestock up to his bathroom?

You can't rely on other people for that.

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wrote:

Add a face shield to that list. WW
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On Tue, 21 Dec 2010 00:47:04 -0800, harry wrote:

Old claw-foots maybe... not so sure about the plain ones, though.
Ours are odd - the exposed flat side panel is cast as part of the bath, but there's no opposite side (hidden against the wall), so they must have been available in 'left' and 'right' configurations. (Well, that's not 'odd' because there must have been lots of them made, but I don't know why they didn't make a bath with a seperate side panel that you could put on whichever side you wanted.)
cheers
Jules
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On Dec 21, 8:38am, Jules Richardson

re: "...but I don't know why they didn't make a bath with a seperate side panel that you could put on whichever side you wanted."
Probably cheaper to just cast them in one piece.
Think TCO.
You'd have to add in inventory storage costs, packaging, shipping, cataloging, etc.
Then there be the attachment method to consider - another expense.
Besides, how would you design a cast iron tub that had a lip in each side so that either one could be installed against the wall and allow the wallboard to cover it? If the lip was part of the side panel, you'd have a seam that would have to be dealt with.
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On Tue, 21 Dec 2010 06:22:49 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I would expect the lip to be part of the bath itself, with the top of the side panel(s) slotting into the underside of the lip and then secured at the floor level with a couple of screws (or clips if you wanted to be fancy). Maybe someone had a patent on that design or something, though.
I'm not sure that it causes an inventory headache - a buyer would just get a bath and a standard side panel (which will fit whichever side they want), so yes it's two things rather than one, but I don't think it's really different from having to stock two different all-in-one bath castings.
I have no idea what our baths have at the far ends, though - they're big baths (much longer than modern ones, which is nice) so have a wall at both the top and bottom. Maybe there's a built-in end panel at the bottom, but maybe not (there's certainly not one at the top). The fittings are all 1930's, but I'm not sure if the baths are the same age.
cheers
Jules
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On Dec 21, 9:54am, Jules Richardson

re: "I would expect the lip to be part of the bath itself"
How could you have the lip on both sides of the tub?
Look here:
http://www.solwerks.net/blog/hello/333281/640/Basement%20remodel%20073%20crop%20edit-2005.03.24-09.12.16.jpg
What are you going to do with the sharp lip on the exposed side of the top? The side that facing into the bathroom?
I know I wouldn't want to sit on it!
Besides the drain and overflow have to match your plumbing. You can't have a drain on both sides.
As far as inventory goes, with left and right hand tubs you have 1 size item requiring 1 size shelving and 1 size packaging. Only the labels are different.
20,000 tubs = 20,000 boxes
With a tub and side panel you need different storage set-ups for each item (extra cost), you need 10,000 of one size box and 10,000 of another - or styrofoam, or bubble wrap or whatever. (extra cost), you need different handling equipment, especially if we're talking robotic manufacturing and warehousing (extra cost), you need more complicated packaging if you are packing both parts in one outside box (extra cost). The list goes on.
However, all of that is a moot point since we still have the lip and drain to deal with.
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On Dec 21, 6:54am, Jules Richardson

You are ignoring the need for having the drain on either the left or right end depending on location. Left hand drain could not be just turned around to make it a right hand one. Your "finished" side would be against the wall.
Harry K
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On Tue, 21 Dec 2010 09:28:30 -0800, Harry K wrote:

Wait... are we getting mixed up here? By 'sides' I'm talking about the longest sides, by 'ends' I mean the shorter "sides" at the head and foot of the bath...
That's my whole point, anyway - the old baths that I have can't be turned round to suit any location, because only one (long) side is covered (and maybe the bottom end too, but I can't see that), and it's a single-piece casting.
Having a seperate panel for a (long) side would mean one design of bath that could fit any location, with the panel attached by the installer to the exposed side, but there must have been a reason that they weren't designed that way; perhaps casting the bath with a little groove on the underside of the outer-edge lip that the panel could slot up into was too complex, or something (or it's an inventory thing as DD mentioned).
Another possibility is that they *only* offered the bath in the one configuration, and you were supposed to design the room around it. Seems unlikely, but who knows...
cheers
Jules
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On Dec 21, 10:55am, Jules Richardson

No, there is no confusion. Look at any tub and you will see one finished "long" side and one unfinished "long side" (same for ends, some only one finished some none). Try turning a Lefty that looks good that way and trun it around, now try to make that "panel' of yours look just as good as what was the finished side.

Well, if you can design a 'panel' that will be seamless or at least look as good as a seamless facing into the room....

Nope, the choice was to build 'lefts' and 'rights' or put a finished side all around.
Harry K
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Hmmm...after a bit more thought...If a removable panel can be designed to look good then the real answer is to produce a tub with no sides or ends and provide one long panel and either one, two or no short panels. It would now fit any bath design. The 'appearance factor' should not be a hard problem to solve.
Harry K
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I still don't see how you would deal with the flange that goes on the "unfinished" side.
I am referring to the flange that gets covered by the wallboard...the flange shown up against the studs in this picture:
http://www.solwerks.net/blog/hello/333281/640/Basement%20remodel%20073%20crop%20edit-2005.03.24-09.12.16.jpg
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On Wed, 22 Dec 2010 04:05:22 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'm not seeing how it's a problem - how's it any different between a bath that has integral side-panels and one that doesn't? The profile of the flange / rim / lip is still the same for both, and they'd both be sealed against the wall in the same way.
cheers
Jules
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On Dec 22, 9:22am, Jules Richardson

The flange is typically molded onto the 2 ends and the "unfinished" side, as a single continous strip and an integral part of tub - no seam.
The wallboard comes down over the flange and the flange prevents water from getting behind the tub. Even if the caulking were bad, you'd need a substantial amount of water such that it would go up over the flange and wet the studs or drip onto the floor.
In an earlier post you said:
"the top of the side panel(s) slotting into the underside of the lip"
What lip? The curved, finished lip that is on the finished side of today's single sided tubs? The lip on the side that we usually sit on?
OK, I'll give you that. Put a finished curve on both sides of the tub and allow the side panel to slip under it. Fine.
Now tell me how the flange that sticks *up* gets attached to the unfinished side without creating a seam that could allow water to get behind the tub?
Once again, look at the picture found here:
http://www.solwerks.net/blog/hello/333281/640/Basement%20remodel%20073%20crop%20edit-2005.03.24-09.12.16.jpg
You can't see the back corners, but the flange is continuous around those corners and also slopes down and disappears as it approaches the finished side so that you can finish the front corners more easily.
I'm not saying it can't be done, but I'm having trouble picturing how you would add a watertight flange when using a detachable side panel. Did you have something in mind that addresses that issue?
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