Remove toilet in basement

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Hello, There is a toilet in our basement that I think hasn't been used for years (we moved in last year). I'd like to remove it. The flange and pipe are metal. What do I need to do to cap the sewer line. I don't think I will ever want to hook this toilet up again. Thanks
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BTW, this is in a corner of the basement so I don't really care if it's level to the floor. I'm just going to put some shelving in that corner. Thanks
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Mash wrote:

You won't, but the next owner will. Normal toilet, or one of the special up-flush models? If the latter, those are expensive and a pain to find. And is there a sink, or the pipes for one, and a shower as well? If next owner wants a playroom or man-cave in basement, bathroom or working stubs for one can be a big selling point. If your heart is set on ripping it out, cap the pipes cleanly, so they can be reused, and build the shelves around it. Bottom shelf in a basement setting should be a few inches off the floor anyway, in case it floods. If you don't know how to cap pipes, pay the few bucks for a plumber to do it. For just the sewer, plumbing aisle at the borg should have bolt-on gasketed caps that will plug it well.
-- aem sends...
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Thanks. It's just the toilet, no sink or shower. I would definitely rather just cap it than rip it out, so I'll look for the bolt-on cap that you mentioned.
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Oh, and the toilet is just a normal one. So yeah, I think the best is to leave everything in place and just cap...I actually plan on finishing a portion of the basement and who knows, I might want a toilet down there someday in the distant future when my kids are teenagers or something. I'll go to home depot and see if they have a cap. Do I need to remove the flange to put the cap on?
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wrote:

If that is an older toilet with a large tank, I advise you to retain it. If you ever do desire a toilet in the basement, it will perform much better than new low flow units will down there.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Most decent mid priced low flow toilets work just fine, higher end ones are even better. In fact the good low flow toilets work better than many old toilets that use much more water. The complete kits for $99.99 are shit. You get what you pay for. I lost track of when I installed an American Standard Champion 4. Probably over 6 months ago. I do know that I have never had to plunge it, or even flush it twice to finish the job. Guaranteed to flush something like 14 golf balls, although I seldom eat golf balls and when I do I chew them.
Check this out: http://www.americanstandard-us.com/video/default.aspx#Champion4_Flushing_Demo
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wrote:

Tony - I know all of that already. This toilet is IN THE BASEMENT, where you don't have much gravity to help your toilet flush. It makes a gigantic difference.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I hope you are joking or mixing up "gravity" with some other word. I never noticed feeling lighter when down in the basement! ;-)
In case you were serious, toilets actually work by siphon action. The siphon action in the toilet itself, nothing to do with the plumbing. Once it gets to the plumbing there is no siphon action due to the vent.
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wrote:

Have you noticed any difference in the effort required to walk uphill compared to walking downhill?

You have much to learn.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

OP never said what level his sewer outflow pipe was at. In modern subdivisions, they are usually partway up basement wall, but if this is an older urban house or a sloped lot or something, his sewer outflow could actually be low enough for a conventional toilet to work in the basement. All depends on how level of basement slab relates to sewer main level. My basement slab is actually slightly above street level, but no sewers out here.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I know all this stuff. My pipe is in the basement floor and exits the house many feet below grade. Being that flow from the basement toilet is on that essentially horizontal run means that a low flow toilet often doesn't push the waste far enough in the pipe, and it can build up just outside the toilet, causing subsequent flushes to be less effective and prone to backing up. Upstairs, the waste leaves the toilet and has a significant drop which gets it well clear of the toilet, preventing buildup or backups. A low flow toilet model that works very well on my first floor, did not work well in my basement. The only difference being the 8 or 10 foot vertical drop from the first floor toilet down to the horizontal line in the basement floor.
In other words, I actually have low flow toilets in my house and they work fine when used in conjuction with gravity (upstairs) to keep the line near the toilet clear. I have actually installed the same model in my basement, where it is mounted directly to the line in the floor, and it didn't work well. I put the original toilet back and the new one is sitting uninstalled elsewhere in the basement.
I'm not guessing. I have first hand experience.
I'm not against low flow toilets. I have them on 2 floors of my house and they are completely trouble free. They just don't work as well in the basement. I like them enough that I went out and bought one to replace a perfectly good working OLD toilet in my basement. If it had worked, I would have been pleased. It didn't.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

OH! You must be talking about the flush up toilets! I missed where the OP said it was one of them. Lots of basement floors are above the septic line.

Can you teach me?
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wrote:

No, I'm not talking about flushing uphill, Tony. Let's try this again. Do you notice any diffence in energy required to ride a bicycle on a flat road compared to riding a bicycle down a hill?

That's a good question. So far, you seem pretty slow to understand things.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That depends on what gear I'm in uphill vs. downhill.

Ok, I got it! Your toto toilet doesn't work well in the basement due to differences in _your_ plumbing, so that means _all_ low flow toilets will not work well in basements.
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wrote:

You just failed the test badly.

No, obviously you "don't got it".
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Not true, I have a Toto toilet that will out perform any thing on the market. Maybe you never heard of Toto , do a little research on it.
wrote:

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I OWN 3 Toto toilets. They work great - on the first and second floor. I tried one in my basement and it didn't perform as well as the old toilet being replaced, so I took it out and put the old one back.

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

So is that where your claim of not working in the basement comes from? One sample?
If the basement is plumbed properly, it should make no difference.
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wrote:

One very clear example where 3 identical toilets sharing one waste line have different performance. The two toilets that work well are almost directly above the one in the basement. There is very little that is different except the one in the basement is mounted directly to the wasteline in the slab, and lacks any vertical drop like the one that the other two toilets take advantage of to work properly.

You are guessing. I am not guessing.
The basement is plumbed properly. Proof of that is that the original toilet WHICH I PUT BACK AFTER THE LOW FLOW DIDN"T WORK WELL, works perfectly and has never had a problem or backed up in the 20 years or so I've been here.
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