Remove hot water radiator for remodeling project

Hi all. I'd like to remove a hot water radiator for a small remodeling project. Here are some details:
Hot water radiator system. It is a "two pipe" system, I think. That is, the radiators have two pipes coming out of them.
This radiator is on the second floor. There are three radiators total on this floor, two in other rooms.
Can I drain just the one room's radiator to move it out of the way? *Must* I drain the radiator before moving it?
Can I cap the pipes to let me fill the system back up and thus get heat? (It is winter right now!) If so, how can I cap the pipes? How can I determine the proper size caps/threads, etc.? What tools do I need to unscrew the radiator from the pipes? Any danger/caution areas I should be aware of that I haven't though of?
Unfortunately (well, fortunately, really) I have a baby on the way and need to have this project done before the little pooper is out. So waiting 'till spring is not gonna work.
I am a fairly decent DIY'er and not afraid to tackle a difficult project. But not *too* difficult -- should I pay someone to do this? (Of course, "too" difficult is in the eye of the beholder. To me, "too" difficult means significant investment in new tools is needed, or a highly skilled technique is required).
Thanks for your advice, all. Mappy Chrismakkah!
--
-------------------------
| Jeffrey Silverman |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeffrey Silverman wrote:

Lots of variables on this. You probably must drain the system water level below that floor level. Be sure to close the boiler fill valve. Cast iron radiators will have radiator unions you can disconnect. But...there is no *easy* way to cap them off. If it's an old system, there is a reasonably good chance that removing the union from the pipe will break something. Might try to scrounge up a mating union which you can cap off.
That's one scenario; there are others depending upon the age and system arrangement.
Personally, I think you're taking a big risk by opening the system at this time of year...
Do a GOOGLE on "radiator removal" or some such. Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes if possible- or you'll likely end up splashing water all over the place. That and radiators are very heavy all by themselves.

You can certainly try..

Measure the diameter of the pipe before disassembling, match it to fittings at your neighborhood Home Despot/BLowes. Then make really sure you want to tear into your heating system in the midst of winter; unintended consequences could lead to a considerable amount of work, and some uncomfortably pointed comments from SWMBO.

You'll probably have to start with a couple monkey wrenches- big ones, 18" at least. Depending on the fittings and how rusted solid they are, you may need heavier artillery- or declare victory and work around the radiator.

The pipes may shift a bit once you free them from the radiator, and may require considerable horsing to get them back into position once the radiator is back. Don't drop the radiator on your toe.
Gregm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< should I pay someone to do this >>
If your IQ exceeds your shoe size, of course you should. Dealing with old iron fittings requires brute force with finesse to an amazing degree. Your plumber will show up with pipe wrenches a yard long (nifty aluminum types, $$$) plus all kinds of fittings, pipe cutters, threaders and who knows what else. His truck will be sitting on the spring stops so you know there's heavy artillery in there. You need to buy as much time as possible to work on the remodel, so there's no point in learning a new trade the hard way at this time. Given the time of year and the scheduled increase in your family, the smart move is to have a pro do the heavy lifting. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 19:19:12 -0500, "Jeffrey Silverman"

rusted together are an accident waiting to happen and it isn't like pregnant ladies are known for their amazing understanding and patience when it is 30 degrees in the house.
Steve B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Dec 2003 14:09:48 +0000, Joe wrote:

Thank you, everyone, for your advice.
I am going to take an "if it ain't broke don't fix it" approach and leave the radiator in place. I will figure out a way to work around it.
Luckily I found that I could wiggle it away from the wall a smidge to increase the space between the rad and the wall a tiny bit.
Happy holidays!
--
Jeffrey D. Silverman | jeffrey AT jhu DOT edu
Website | http://www.wse.jhu.edu/newtnotes /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.