Remove concrete in 2" PVC pipe


Cocrete finishers accidently got concrete in the skimmer box of my pool & the plumber failed to seal off the 2 inch pipe leading to the skimmer box. Does anyone know of a chemical that would help break up the concrete in the PVC pipe and not harm the PVC pipe. I was told that car anti-freeze may work. I have tried using a 3/8 inch pipe snake to lossen the conrete, but it tends to bind the snake up more than it can effectively remove the concrete. I want to leave cutting out the concrete sidewalk around the skimmer box as a last resort.
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On 6 Mar 2007 12:36:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would call the concrete finishers. Find out what do they do after they fail to check for properly sealed pipes and insert concrete into them.
Just a guess....
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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On Mar 6, 12:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How old is the concrete & how thick (long, deep) is the clog?
If its more than a day old, mechanical removal will be difficult
Pool acid will dissolve but you're going to need a LOT.
Anti-freeze? Never heard of that method.
Cheers Bob
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On Mar 6, 2:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you find any solution (!) to the problem, let the world know. Locally, our ready-mix concrete folks have some mixing drums off their delivery trucks sitting in the storage yard, victims of concrete setting up prematurely (some real sad stories there). From the sledge hammer marks you can tell some desperate attempts were made to salvage the rigs. If you check the back lots of some of your own local construction companies, I'm sure you will similar concrete related gear that has suffered similar mishaps and been retired. Based on these facts, finding a tidy fix is not too likely. Personally, I wouldn't waste any time on the disaster. Better get busy on replacement and repair and talk to the responsible parties about sharing the cost. Good luck.
Joe
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On 6 Mar 2007 12:36:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Mutriatic acid
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On Tue, 06 Mar 2007 21:49:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or Lysergic acid diethylamide (much more fun to use).
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On 6 Mar 2007 12:36:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Besides elbow grease, the only other chemical that will shift concrete easily is semtex.
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