Remove ceiling treatment


In the attached pictures, is this "popcorn" treatment of the ceiling?
http://i34.tinypic.com/18ok1z.jpg
http://i34.tinypic.com/30w8ccp.jpg
Whatever it is, it is kind of "crumbly" and if one touches it or brushes against it hard, it seems to fall off in little crumbs.
We're thinking of repainting the room, and I wonder if I can simply scrape this off the ceiling and repaint? SHould I put on a primer?
It is in an upstairs room and I'm also not sure if this treatment is perhaps partially an insulation, although I doubt it.
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I can't help with ideas about removal, but here's a little known fact: If you can positively identify the people responsible for applying that texture, it's legal to beat them up. Not a lot. Just enough to make them think about their crime against humanity.
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On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:20:08 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

I like the popcorn texture.
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*First, round over the corners of a 3"-4" scraper/putty knife .. that way, when you scrape the ceiling, you won't dig in any place where the knife might grab. Then .. use any kind of sprayer .. a garden type sprayer is excellent .. and wet the surface. Give it a few minutes to soften the popcorn stuff, and scrape away. It IS a mess, but it's not hard. With the debris dampened, it will fall straight down so you can place a few tarps on the floor to catch it.*
On 8/3/2010 12:14 PM, MikeB wrote:

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What he said. It turns soft with plain water. Move out ALL furniture if you can, and spread visqueen so that it goes up the wall a bit. It is a messy job, but very simple. A sprayer and some scrapers are all you need. Once you have it scraped off, you might want to go over it with damp cloths to get the rest. Scrape tenderly so you don't create any patch up work.
HTH
Steve
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Oh boy, I started reading up on this and it turns out those popcorn treatments can contain asbestos! :(
My house was built in 1983. What are the odds that I need to test this for asbestos and go through the whole hassle of dealing with asbestos stuff? Is it mostly a scare or is this serious? The room is only about 14x16, so it isn't huge.
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If you call the asbestos testing facility, they can tell you about the probability of asbestos in the texture for the timeframe.
The look didn't bother me, so I just painted over my asbestos-filled ceiling texture to seal it in.
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wrote:
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Asbestos was banned in 1980. Highly unlikely that it would be in a house built in 1983, although I suppose there is still a very slim chance.
Since the process of removing the popcorn involves thoroughly soaking it, asbestos would be rendered pretty safe anyway. It's when the dry fibers become airborne and are breathed that it is a problem.
Just clean up all the wet glop and put it in a hefty bag. Done! - regardless of whether or not there is any asbestos in it.
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MikeB wrote:

1. Commercial asbestos in tile, insulation, etc. is NOT harmful. Removal via wetting and scraping is the approved method of disposal anyway.
2. If you test for asbestos, and the test is positive, you're screwed. You'll be required to employ EPA-approved asbestos abatement teams at a cost (I'm not kidding) of several thousand dollars. You may, moreover, have to disclose that you knew about your home being contaminated with toxins to any future buyers (if you can find a buyer). Here is a case where ignorance is bliss.
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Oh boy, I started reading up on this and it turns out those popcorn treatments can contain asbestos! :(
My house was built in 1983. What are the odds that I need to test this for asbestos and go through the whole hassle of dealing with asbestos stuff? Is it mostly a scare or is this serious? The room is only about 14x16, so it isn't huge.
reply:
Asbestos is a problem when it is dry and floats in the air. It will be wet, therefore won't fly. Wear little masks if it makes you feel better. I'd say the chances you got any asbestos is zero, or only slightly greater. Meaning you could have some, but wet it is no problem. Take off some of the popcorn and soak it. Let all the mud come off. Is what you have left styrofoam, or can you pull threads out of it when it is dry?
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Wetting not only allows you to scrape it off easily, but there is no dust, as with dry scraping. What you have is acoustic beading (styrofoam), mixed with sheetrock mud (wet gypsum), and it has been sprayed onto your ceiling. This was initially a common commercial application, back in the 50s, 60s & 70s, that eventually moved into our homes, 70s & 80s. Yes, use drop cloths or visquene. You don't want to be mopping or vacuuming your floor, to remove that stuff from the floor.
I've found, using a 8" sheetrock paddle is easiest for scraping and gets the most off with one swipe.
Once off, you will likely need to float your ceiling sheetrock, again, but most likely just one floating.
Sonny
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I'm just back from a trip to Lowes and I was going to ask if it wasn't acoustic beadin as opposed to popcorn. :) Thanks for confirming that it is a huge relief.
What does it mean to "float" the ceiling sheetrock?
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The question is: Why is there a popcorn ceiling?
In some cases, popcorn/stipple is used to cover/hide cracked/stained plaster or some other defect.
Being as your house was built in '83, I doubt you have plaster - but you might.
My point is that the popcorn might be *hiding* something that you'll need to deal with once you expose it.
By "float the sheetrock" I assume he means to apply a skimcoat of drywall mud to achive a smooth, clean surface for primer/paint to adhere to.
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DerbyDad03 wrote the following:

The main reason is that it eliminates the reason for the third coat of joint compound. The spacklers don't have to come back the third day.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Yes, that's *one* reason.
Lousy drywall application/repair, water stains, blood splatter, etc. are also reasons why the original ceiling might be hidden.
I don't think luminol will find blood that's covered by the popcorn.
I found a pretty poorly repaired plaster ceiling under (on top of?) my stipple. There was a large hole from a leak that was patched with a piece of brown drywall-type material as well as numorous cracks in the plaster.
The stipple actually did a really good job of hiding everything.
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Been there, done that. I took a piece of Oak board about 4 inches by 16 inches and 3/4 inch thick. Drilled a hole in it to accept an old broom handle. Would rest the square edge against the ceiling and scrap the popcorn off. This left a nice textured ceiling. Primed it and painted. Looked great. WW
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I use a 12" drywall knife with my shop vac hose plus floor brush adapter taped to it. With output to my Magna Sand water filled filter and suitable respirator the job takes half an hour or less for a 300 square foot room. With double bagged residue there is better disposal than the professionals employ. IMHO, most of the hype about asbestos dangers is way overblown. But do whatever you think best if you need to feel safe,
Joe
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wrote:

I use a 12" drywall knife with my shop vac hose plus floor brush adapter taped to it. With output to my Magna Sand water filled filter and suitable respirator the job takes half an hour or less for a 300 square foot room. With double bagged residue there is better disposal than the professionals employ. IMHO, most of the hype about asbestos dangers is way overblown. But do whatever you think best if you need to feel safe,
Joe
========= Which aspect of asbestos exposure do you feel is overblown? There are two primary aspects:
1) The likelihood of actually having it in one's home.
2) The effects of actually inhaling it.
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