Remove cast iron tub intact?

I know the sledgehammer routine for removing tubs is the standard answer but I'd like to remove this one intact.
I've got the bathroom down to studs, I've got the bathtub off the floor and face down on a 4-wheel dolly. The bathroom is exactly 5' wide its entire length and there's just not enough room to swing the tub so I can shove it through the door.
It seems like the answer - short of removing wall studs - is to put the tub back down on the floor, bottom down, and then tip the tub to vertical, followed by tipping it back down face forward onto the dolly.
Or is there some other way of doing this?
TIA
Tom Young
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TomYoung wrote:

probably not. I'd have a couple helpers for that job, and you might want to measure to make sure it will even work. The tub may have been moved in before the last wall was built.
nate
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TomYoung wrote:

Tub is under the window, huh? Answer is 'it depends'. I think you are on the right track. Sometimes the best thing to do is stand the tub on end, and walk it out of the room like a refrigerator, or use a refrig dolly to move it from the face side. Not seeing how the pads and braces under the tub, and the wall studs, are laid out, I can't suggest how to rotate it in multiple dimensions at once to english it out of there. In a tiny bath like that, dollies are not always an option- sometimes 3 big guys and a lot of grunting is the only answer. That is why contractor usually says 'sledgehammer and replace'. Tub usually goes in first, and bathroom is built around it. Are you saving to reuse in same spot, or elsewhere? Or do you need to rebuild the floor frame and decking under it?
Don't give up- old iron tubs, if the porcelain is good, are worth saving. They beat the heck out of all but the high-end special-order modern tubs.
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Instead of a dolly put down a piece of carpet or a tarp anf drag it out on that.
This works really well if you put down plastic first. Maybe even easier than a dolly.
Jimmie
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aemeijers wrote:

Are they significantly better than brand new cast iron tubs?
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Bob F wrote:

You priced a Real Cast Iron tub, lately? If the porcelain coating on the old one is good, not cracked or stained, and still shiny, it is worth a couple hundred bucks in effort or hired labor to salvage it, assuming the color and style meet your (and SWMBO's) requirements. I'm sure you can still get brand new tubs that are as good, but you won't find them at the big box, and you will pay through the nose. If it isn't abused, and there is nothing horrible in the water or the cleaning chemicals used, a good porcelain-coated tub can last a century or more. Modern plastic or fiber ones look tired after 20 years. Other than where idiot Previous Owner chipped it by dropping wrenches, the 1960 tub in this place looks like new. The plastic 1978 shower stall in the addition looks like it belongs in the type of motel where you only stay when everything else is booked solid.
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aemeijers wrote:

I bought a new cast iron tub at Home Depot a few months ago. They are in stock, $329.
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Bob F wrote:

or that thick faux-cast stuff that feels less flimsy than a typical plastic tub. When I looked online last year, Real Iron tubs from the major brands started several hundred higher than that.
(checks Lowes website)
Well, I guess my search params were too tight last time. I did find a couple entry-level ones in the mid-300s. But only a couple. Most were anywhere from several hundred higher to several thousand for the 'designer' tubs.
I still the old ones are worth salvaging, if they are in good shape, just on principle.
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That is exactly what I did. It was extremely heavy and hard to maneuver but I eventually got it out. And once I loaded it into the back of the Ranger pickup it almost brought the front tires off the ground. :)
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On 3/15/2009 10:28 AM snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com spake thus:

Like the punch line to the old joke goes, I used to have a truck like that too.
A local place that sells old plumbing fixtures and such (the Sink Factory in Berkeley, fantastic place) has a tub one of my clients might want. I asked how much it was and the owner told me "a buck a pound--$350" (this was for a 5'6" tub).
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wrote:

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Did mine that way. Really not bad if you have a dolly to truck it out on or a helper. I used an appliance dolly and wheeled it out like a fridge. Don't think a sledge hammer route will get you anything but sore arms.
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in2dadark wrote:

The hammer will allow you to break it into carryable chunks in a few minutes. No big deal.
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TomYoung wrote:

Remove the windows and cut enought studs to make it wider, then you can replace them or put in a nice larger window.
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