Removal and replacement of tub drain

I removed my old tub drain, and replaced it with a new one, could I have over tightened the new one to the point that I now have a leek?
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Gary The Happy Pirate wrote:

Yes I did.
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handyman wrote:

There is also a rubber gasket under the tub (hard to replace), between the "shoe" and the tub bottom.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

interest in this thread). My guess is that mine is a twist type drain plug and someone along the line had some spare parts. I'm thinking about replacing the overflow and drain now since I have the ceiling in the bedroom below open (chasing a leak, not yet found). Anyway, reading this thread I was wondering how it all goes together or more importantly, comes apart. Searching the net I found this that may be of interest (leaking gasket):
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/plumbing/bathtub/drain2/replace . htm
It seems it is possible to overtightened the gasket, squeezing it out.
--
Keith

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Keith Williams wrote:

cost$550. to fix it and I will have a 36inch hole in my ceiling under the tub, it is up stairs over my den. I think the 36 inch holes is bull and I also think I am getting ripped off on the price. I am a painter and handyman and can fix the hole but think a 24 inch at most will work.
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handyman wrote:

If it *is* the gasket and nothing more tragic, it is (barely) possible to replace it from above.
Unscrew the drain flange. Use a thin wire hook of some sort to reach thru the opening and between the tub "shoe" and tub bottom to grab the old gasket. Pull it up thru the opening.
Coat the new gasket with sealant (silicone caulk works well). Slide the gasket thru the opening and guide it between the shoe and tub bottom.
Coat the flange of the drain fitting with plumbers putty (you could use caulk here too) and screw it into the shoe. It doesn't need to be overtight as this could squeeze the gasket out.
This works *most* of the time. If it doesn't, you're not out a dime and you can chop the hole in the ceiling.
Jim
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Speedy Jim wrote:

Thanks, I will give a try. Like you said, beats cutting the hole. I ewill let you know how it turns out.
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

My leak isn't in the drain. It's coming from somewhere above the rim of the tub. I can see it dripping off the tub edge, under the mixing valve. I can't tell if it's a grout/calk failure or a leak after the mixing valve/diverter. In any case the sheetrock was wet and had to come out. I tore it out spanning two joists (32") and about square to make sure I got all the bad sheetrock out.
I'm thinking about replacing the drain/overflow while I'm in there because the stopper won't stay open. I've owned the house for 13 years and we've used up a few paint stirrers in the mean time. ;-)
I had to cut a couple of holes in the ceiling in the bathroom across the hall, so I'll have some fun patching holes. If I had half a brain I'd gut the whole bathroom and the bedroom ceiling and pay someone to do the mud.
--
Keith

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