Removable windows

I have a quaint 1940s cottage style sun porch with 11 identical, 15-light, single pane windows that I unlock and replace with framed screens in the warmer months. I have to store the windows/screens when they are not used, of course, but they don't take up much space and the porch looks (and feels) really nice with the windows out of the picture. Likewise, not having screens interfere with the view in the cooler months is great.
The problem is that all the windows are in really bad need of being reglazed (ugh!) and repainted, but I'm wondering if I would be better off for energy savings and workload if I just replace the windows. I want to have no glass in the warm months and no screens in the cooler months. I recently purchased a screen door that has exactly this capability, but I have been unable to find windows that do this. Does anyone know if it's possible to buy a window/screen system like this?
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Couldn't you just use double hung replacement windows with full screens? Most replacement windows have removable sashes and screens. You could remove the sashes, the screens, or both without much trouble.
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Gina and Les Armstrong wrote:

look pretty awful in this situation. We have talked about casement windows as a last resort fall back option, but we really want to keep the same look and functionality we have now.
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In your situation as explained, your best bet is to glaze the windows. Since they are removable and can be laid on a saw horse or table it really isn't all that bad of a job. In fact you might be able to take them to a local glass place and have it done.
If you choose DIY, post again or email me. I have a detailed post that I copied or wrote.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

I'm sure I have instructions on glazing somewhere, but I'm always open to additional information. :-) From what I remember, the glazing isn't so hard, it's the old glazing removal that's a PITA, and the priming and painting around all the trim is so tedious.
S-
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If the old stuff doesn't come out pretty easy I leave it in place. I started that practice after I bought a few pieces of glass that I broke trying to get the old stuff out.
Here is the text from a previous post of mine:
Boiled linseed oil, fresh putty, the proper tool, the right moves, and a little practice.
Buy your DAP brand glazing compound from a paint store or other place that sells a lot of it. Old stuff degrades in the can and becomes difficult to work with.
Buy a "bent" glazing ( putty) knife at the same time. They are available in 1/2" and 3/4" widths. The proper tool and practice makes the job easy.
Paint the wood sash with boiled linseed oil and allow it to dry (at least a couple hours) while the can of dap sets in the sun
Take a ball of putty and work it in your hands to warm it. I am right handed. Hold the putty in your left hand and press the putty into place into place using the knife from top to bottom or left to right. All you are doing now in getting the putty in place on all four sides of the frame. It will be over filled and uneven. Then you go back and finish it removing the excess which is added back to the ball for the next window. With practice you will learn to feed the putty from through the end of your fingers in a very quick manner.
To finish you start at a top or left corner and press gently on the putty knife with your left thumb as you pull the knife to the bottom or right in one long continuous stroke. It may take more than one finish stoke until you get the hang of it. The side edges of the knife blade should rest against the wood and the glass as you press and pack the putty into the triangle shape. The handle should point in the direction you are pulling towards.
Colbyt
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If the glass is the old wavey type, save it. It's valuable to the right folks. It's now called art glass and is expensive. The window openings are most probably not square. That's going to make replacement with manufactured units difficult. TB
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