Remodeling:Dryer vent thru attic or not (pic)

We've added a den to the back of our house (where the dryer vent was vented) The wall where the dryer vented will now house a new fireplace. We have two options. Going up thru the attic (vented outside) or an elbow turn to the left and down the wall about 20 ft. Is an inch slope enough of a slope? This is metal duct work and will be housed in a wooden box as there will be brick and stone (for the fireplace and hearth) surrounding it. I just can't see going UP thru the attic with moisture laden air. Seems like it would be too "heavy" and the clothes would take forever to dry. All precautions have been considered if we vented down the side of the wall. Lumber is treated, there is ample space between the firebox and ductwork. Where the duct elbows out of the wall, there will be cabinets so access to the elbow is possible from either side of the wall (den side or laundry room side). Here is a link to a picture that might be useful in visualizing what I'm trying to explain. This has been a temporary setup. The new duct, as I said earlier will be metal and encased in a wood box. This temporary setup is sloped more than we would be able to do permanently. At this current height the hearth and firebox would have to be too tall. http://www.pbase.com/image/18837972 Thanks, Monica
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There ought to be a law against venting dryers anywhere except through an outside wall according to an acquaintance, a professional architect. A further comment, "This is what happens when you just pick up a hammer and start remodeling". His suggestion, tear out the mistakes, get some professional help planning, and do it right. That said, maybe it might be prudent to build a laundry addition following best practices for appliance requirements. One might also consider moving the laundry facilities upstairs as has been mentioned in this NG before. HTH.
Joe
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You do not want a 20 foot long horizontal dryer run--the dryer won't work! They can't stand that much duct resistance. "up" is actually not a problem, warm air (even warm moist air) rises, otherwise chimneys would never have been invented. But if you have to go up 20 feet, say, you are still going to have a problem unless you use larger ductwork (5 or 6 inch would be ok I think.) And you ARE going to vent thru the roof or something, aren't you? Dumping that dryer air in the attic would be a disaster.

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On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 14:25:14 -0400, "donald girod"

What do you mean by that statement?
Have a nice week...
Trent
Help keep down the world population...have your partner spayed or neutered.
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The shorter and more direct the run, the better. Elbows count for several feet of straight duct. Clean out is important maintenance, so the fewer bends the better. If you do go up, continue the duct outside.
Bobst makes a very good point about professional help. Consultations without extensive drawings can be real cost savers in the long run.
Tom Baker
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