Relocating a 10' x 12" shed

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On Sat, 18 Jul 2009 20:58:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@asgard.slcc.edu wrote:

15X15 roof was to hang a 15 foot canoe from, and the attic space up top was designed to store a pair of airplane wings if required.
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On Sat, 18 Jul 2009 16:56:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
-snip-

Bet it doesn't. Do the math and prove me wrong & I'll email you a beer.
What kind of hardwood & why waste it on studs and flooring for a shed?
You're not an old Beechnut employee are you? An uncle worked at a Beechnut plant in the 60's. Some raw materials he was working with came from south America. The boxes were 1" red mahogany. Not many boards over 4 feet long-- but some real nice 5/4x18 clear mahogany. He had a shed full.
Jim
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wrote:

on. A friend had cut up about 6 months worth for firewood and he offered me about 3 weeks production worth.
Figure 4 lbs per board foot and about .9 bf/linear foot. Each 8 foot stud weighs over 28 lb. 8 studs per side is 32 studs for 896 lbs. Double plate and sill is another 480 lbs. so the framing for the walls alone is over 1350 lbs. with the window and door cut out. Add plate above and below window and lintel over the door and you are back up over 1370. The bottom 4 feet is lined with 1" thick boards - just over 100 board feet with the opening for the door deleted for another 400 lbs. We have not got the 2X8 floor joists or the 2" thick floor figured in yet - mostly spruce but still not light when there is 100 square feet of it. Then there is the 15 foot square top deck - again mostly spruce 2X6, with about 120 square feet of 1" thick hardwood floor. ( that's another 400 lbs), and the hardwood framing on the gable ends and the 10 foot 2X4 roof rafters on 12" centers (central ontario snow load) with 3/8" plywood sheathing and 20 year fiberglass shingles. There are"jury struts from the floor framing up to the rafters 3 feet in on the one side and 2 feet in on the other so the span is reduced somewhat. The gables are sheathed with tentest and covered with vinyl siding - and the outside is clad in hardboard siding. There is a 2 foot by 4 foot shelf framed in hardwood in one corner that holds my chain-saws, hedge trimmer and other assorted equipment, and the end acts a a rack to hold material (wood, steel, etc) as well as a 2X3 foot (approx) 3 level shelf where I keep a few motors and assorted parts.. The shelves and supports alone are a few hundred more lbs. If it's not within a hundred pounds of 2 tons I'll be very surprised. Then it's all fastened to8X8 white cedar (like railway ties) (resawn from hydro poles) buried in a gravel filled trench as a foundation.. So you would have to lift it almost a foot before you could start moving it.
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Commish wrote:

Rent a fork lift will do the job.
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I moved our 8'x10' shed a few years ago. I originally built it behind our old mobile home, but when we built our new house the shed would have been right outside the front window. So it was move it or dismantle it.
In my case, the shed was built on a concrete slab. So, I bought some long 2x4's and ran them diagonally inside at the floor to keep the building square. I also ran a 2x4 across the door opening to keep that secure. Then I attached some 2x4's to the studs on each end to use as a jacking point. I unbolted the sill plates from the slab, then slowly jacked up each end, setting it on blocks to allow jacking the other side.
When I had it high enough to clear the anchor bolts, I used a metal blade on a reciprocating saw to cut off all the anchor bolts flush with the slab. Then I slid a 2x6 (laid flat) under each side of the shed, and lowered the shed back down on the 2x6 skids, and screwed the shed to the skids. The skids were about 2' longer than the shed length, so a foot stuck out on each end. I beveled the bottom corners of each board first to help it run over rough ground. Then I attached a 2x4 on top of the skids at each end on the outside of the skids.
I used "Simpson Strong Drive Screws" for all connections. They're kind of like lag bolts, but are self tapping and easy to drive with a drill/driver. They're also easy to remove when the job is finished. They're available in the home centers in the area where the metal brackets, joist hangers, post bases, and whatnot are sold.
I already had a Bobcat on site for doing some landscape work, so I attached a chain to the bucket and at each end of the 2x4 I mounted on the skids outside the shed. The bucket allowed me to lift the front edge slightly, but it probably wasn't needed. Then I started pulling. I expected a major struggle and thought the shed would probably fall apart rather than move. But, it moved effortlessly with no sign of racking. I pulled it about 60' to the back of our new house.
Once I unhooked the chain, I used the bobcat bucket to "nudge" the shed back and forth and side to side until it was in exactly the position I wanted (pushing on the skids, not the shed!).
Then, we jacked the shed up again, took off the 2x6 skids, and poured a new slab underneath, complete with new anchor bolts. I drilled out the sills to meet up with the new bolts, then lowered the shed back down on the slab and bolted it in place. Finally, I removed all the bracing I had installed earlier.
I added a little shed roof extension on one end for firewood storage, then new shingles and a fresh coat of paint to match the house. It looks like it has always been there, and was a lot less work and expense than tearing down the shed and building a new one.
You can rent a bobcat fairly cheap ($250 for the day), but a good pickup truck would probably work just as well. A small shed really doesn't weigh as much as you might think.
Good luck,
Anthony
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