Reglzing double hung wooden windows

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I've read a fair bit about re glazing old windows. Everyone, including the instructions on the back of the DAP 33 container reccommends oil based primer. I have plenty of latex primer and with oil based paints being phased out in general what type of glazing compound should I use with a latex primer?
And why does DAP reccommend oil based primer?
Ian
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Ian wrote:

A good quality oil base exterior primer has a lot of oils in it. These oils penetrated deeply into the wood fibers, providing a great base to your top coats. Those same oils let it stay somewhat flexible for years
to come.
Water based primers are great, except they tend to lay on the surface without penetrating too deep. Use a good long oil primer like BM's Fresh Start, or SW's A-100 exterior oil based primer. Finish coats should be quality 100% acrylic exterior paint. These provide the flexibility, mildew resistance and color fastness superior to oilbased top coats.
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OK, but when oil based paints are no longer with us, what do we do? is their a glazing compund for use with latex primers? I do have SW's A-100 latex primer and am hoping I can just use that. I do like the effect of a good latex bringing out the grain in the wood, that's one of the reasons I'd like to use the latex primer as well.
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Ian wrote:

Not sure. I just redid mine. I used the oil primer for the reasons stated and the 100% acr. for the top coat - due to it's flexability.
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Ian wrote:

DAP 33's instruction sheet says to use an oil-based primer, but you can topcoat with oil or latex. Later in the instructions it says to "always use an oil-based paint for a professional finish." It'd be nice if they made up their minds!
Oil-based paint may have some minor benefit from the oil soaking in and "preserving" the wood, but I would imagine that attention to detail and doing the job right would far outweigh the latex vs. oil question.
As another poster mentioned, Benjamin Moore's Fresh Start is good stuff. They make latex primers as well, and I'd probably go with that. It has extra binders (adhesives) in it and is most tenacious.
R
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Some of us seemed to have missed that memo that they are phasing out oil paints. Who told you that ?
Latex washes up easier, so more people want it, so more stores offer it.
But oil based will still be around for a long time yet.
But if you prefer to use latex, feel free to use it ,....according to the directions.
AMUN
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Amun wrote:

Why do you think _your_ teacher is only letting you use water based fingerpaints now?
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Yes, you did miss the memo:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/23/AR2005052301644.html
Among many, many other references.
- Rich
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"Supply of Oil-Based Paint Thins as New Rule Takes Effect Sale Restrictions Aim to Curb Ozone Pollution"
ROTFLMAO And all this time they've been blaming the poor cows farting, for ozone holes.
This reminds me of the idiots who told everyone to rip out asbstos insulation and foam in the urea formaldehide because it's safer
Fortunately not all of us live in that area.
AMUN

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Amun wrote:

Ahh, so that's why you sport an empty cranium.
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user wrote:

2301644.html
Now if they could just get cars to run on latex...
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Oilbased finishes are not going anywhere. There are countless applications where latex cannot replace oil. A simple rule of thumb is that you can always put latex over oil, but not vice versa. DAP 33 is oil based, therefore it should NOT be applied over a latex primer. If you still have your receipt, take the 33 and exchange it for DAP's Latex Window Glazing. Comes in a tube and applies with a caulking gun. For best adherence, sand down to the wood before painting on the latex primer.
Oh, and AMUN, I thought G Henslee was being too hard on you, but now I'm thinking he's right. If you don't know the oil vs latex issues you have no business giving advice here.
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Not a reliable rule of thumb! In my experience, the only way latex will stick well to oil, is if you thoroughly rough up the oil, then use a good, preferably oil-based primer to assure adhesion of the latex over the prime coat.
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Roger Taylor wrote:

Sorry, that was over-simplified. Latex over oil PRIMER, but not the other way around.
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siralfred if you are unhappy with my advice call 1-800-biteme to get your money back. PLONK
AMUN
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Amun wrote:

Told you your days were numbered here dumbass. Let's see, we can add paint related topics to the growing list of those you haven't a clue about.
electrical tile hvac roofing drywall plumbing appliance repair painting
Did I leave any out ya moron? Bet you wish you could add sex with your sons and daughters to that list...
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DAP suggests oil based primer because it works better. I have also brushed on several coats of boiled linseed oil to prime, ahead of puttying. It fully saturates the wood, allowing the putty to take a proper "set", and slow the drying/aging of the putty. Oil paints for this purpose are not being phased out, and will likely be with us for a long time. Boiled Linseed is not particularly toxic - comes from pressed flaxseed - and is a great wood preservative when used on porous wood, under a coat of oil finish paint, or oil based putty.
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Roger Taylor wrote:

The wood preservative aspect is only important if you're not doing the required maintenance, that is, painting on an as needed schedule. Wood protected by any paint film in good condition will not rot. Neither oil or latex paint will eliminate maintenance. If you're not going to do the required maintenance, the wood windows should be replaced with something not requiring maintenance. Considering how much work is involved in priming, glazing and painting a wood window, and the ongoing maintenance issues, it might be worth consideration to start replacing windows one/few at a time.
I do agree with another poster's comment to the OP about using a latex glazing compound if you're going with latex primer and top coat. No compatability questions that way. I can only blame my omission on low blood sugar.
R
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I agree with Roger, use boiled linseed oil to prime the muntins before glazing with DAP 33, that's what I do. The "long oil" or "penetrating" oil-based primers are linseed oil based, read the ingredients on the can next time you're at the hardware store. The "fast-drying" oil-based primers have no linseed oil, the penetrating oil-based primers do have linseed oil.
Ken
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DON'T WAD THE RAG! Label warns of spontaneous combustion and it is a real possibility.
On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 10:52:00 -0700, "Roger Taylor"

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