Regarding: pitfalls in replacing old toilet? [update]

I'd asked in June about replacing an old toilet and had some concerns about the ability of the new models to flush well. I'll post the update that the new Kohler Wellworth flushes like a champ. Surprisingly so. I guess the problems were only with the interim models that came out years ago.
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Well, thanks for that, but as far as I know the Wellworth line consists of about 10 models ranging from just over $200 to well over $400.
Different models appear to have different flush mechanisms and flush ratings.
Telling us that the "Kohler Wellworth flushes like a champ" would be just a tad more meaningful if we knew which model you are speaking of.
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On 11/8/2010 2:28 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

okay, the box says K-11471-0, which was ~$110 at Lowes. Class 5.
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Flushing like a champ mainly has to do with from how high a distance water is falling or how high the top of the tank is. If there is another significant variable please educate me.
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On 11/9/2010 2:13 AM, Molly Brown wrote:

Well, as soon as I'd taken it out of the box, I could see that the inside of the bowl had a very engineered look to it - whereas the 30 yr old one was mainly rounded everywhere. So these are my guesses as to toilet flow engineering:
When you flush this one, the water rushes as if going down a sluice from front to back. The old toilet operated mainly from gravity pulling down over the trap. But this one also has a lot of push toward the exit hole at the bottom back. They seem to have created these mechanisms:
1) most of the water whooshes down from the front. The holes under the rim are much smaller at the back, largest at front. 2) the shape inside the bowl facilitates that sluice effect, it's like a channel. It's also somewhat longer front-to-back than side-to-side. 3) at the very bottom, there is a V shape, lying on its side, with the exit hole being much larger than the initial end - which is like a truncated point. 4) The very bottom is extra small and normally contains little water, so that most of the 1.6 gpf is involved in the kinetic energy of rushing down from the front - again maximizing push - rather than just laying there. Rough guessing by looking, the water surface is 11" x 5".
I'd also guess that a cross section view would show that the amount which the water has to rise to overcome the trap is much less than the old way. On an old toilet, you see the water level rise after flushing before it then starts to drain - here it just gets pushed right out.
I never thought I'd spend so much thought on toilets, but there it is.
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Hmmm...how about the size of the flapper hole, the siphon outlet (trapway), and the flush valve technology?
"American Standard Flushing systems offer unrivaled performance. Our superior engineering begins with the outlets and flush valves that are the largest in the industry."
- 4" piston action Accelerator flush valve - 2-3/8" fully-glazed trapway
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