refurbish old gas range

Is there a good way to paint or re-color a cook stove? I have an old white gas stove that works fine, but looks bad. All my other appliances are beige/almond/biscuit color and the stove is white. The metal oven handle (chrome?) is corroded. Is there a place to check for replacement parts. This is an old Magic Chef gas stove, no electical parts, most likely from the late 1970s. I like that it does not require electricity to work properly, as do all the new ones that I've seen. Thanks, Eileen
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E Gregory wrote:

The metal parts I would take to a plating shop and see what they can do. Sort of like restoring an old car.
The color is a different problem. Check with one of the companies that paints appliances. You may have a local one or at least one in a town close buy. Make sure they know it is an oven and it will need to be heat resistant.
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There are places that specialize in refinishing appliances. They can do it right at your house. I saw an old refrigerator done over and I swore it was brand new. Check hte Yellow Pages.

If it is chrome, it can be re-pated. The paint guy may have a suggestion or just look for chrome platers in the phone book.

There is a place in CA that restores old appliances from the 1920's and up; they do have a web page. Some of the old ones sure do work well and can look good with some touch-up.
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Thanks for all the help, links, and suggestions. Sounds like it's a do-able thing. Someone asked "why?". I'd rather re-use what I have and do what I can to make it nice, and keep it out of the landfill. Also I like that it requires no electricity and the stoves that are being sold today all seem to require electricity. Maybe some from specialty stores do not. Again, thanks, Eileen
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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If you get a used one, it would certainly have been destined for a landfill anyway.. so it's an even swap. I'm just saying it would likely be cheaper and easier to finding an existing one in the right color (and probably even of the same electric requirements) before going to trouble & expense to reporcelainze this one. I've never heard of anyone doing this to a stove before, but it is very expensive to do it to a bathtub.

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JT, That's one of the things that I'd hoped to find out here, whether it's very expensive to do. Sounds like it just might stay white! Checking with applicance dealers to see what's coming out of homes is a good idea. Eileen
J T wrote:

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Edwin, Do you have any idea (ball park)what they charge for this? Eileen
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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Hi,
One of the restoration companies from the link below can probably help or offer some tips.... http://www.appliance411.com/links/Restoration /
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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I am sure this can be done somehow as others have suggested. The question is, why? It doesn't sound like it has any intrinsic value. You can buy a brand new basic gas range for as little as 300 bucks. You could probably locate a used one for far less. Heck, I would try calling up a local appliance dealer and tell them you'll give them 25 bucks for the next almond gas range they haul away. Sounds like a great deal of effort to save a 30 year old appliance.

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