Refrigerator not working again

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If you recall, a month or so ago I posted about a refrigerator not working.
The compressor unit in it would keep trying to start and would be unable to start, tripping an overload relay.
After some "time off" to let the system cool, the fridge started just fine. I also replaced a capacitor and relay (which was very cheap and possibly not needed) and thought that I was done.
However, since yesterday it started having trouble again. Letting it cool down for a couple of hours would get it started, only to find it unable to restart a few hours later.
What could be the culprit here? Unlike last time, there is no emergency, as we have less food and all our food easily fits in another fridge.
The refrigerator is a Kenmore made by Amana with fancy electronic front control.
i
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:18:40 -0500, Ignoramus25344

    Sounds like it might be broke.

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On Sep 21, 4:18 pm, Ignoramus25344 <ignoramus25...@NOSPAM. 25344.invalid> wrote:

Just guessing, again, but this sounds like the pressure is not bleeding off, for whatever reason. It's hard to imagine seals that would hold pressure for hours, but I suppose it's possible. Or, maybe there's some contamination somewhere - water, perhaps, that's freezing in a low spot in a line?
Wait a minute - I just reread your post - Am I right that it does restart if you let it sit a couple of hours? What if you let it sit a few (maybe 5) minutes? Wait till the compressor is running, then unplug it after a couple of minutes. Then wait five minutes and plug it back in. Does it restart then? If so, there's something wrong with the control circuitry. It should not, under normal circumstances, be trying to start against a load. There should be enough hysterisis in the thermostat, or some sort of lock-out timer to prevent rapid cycling.
Do you maybe have an air leak - lik in the door gasket? I could see how that would cause rapid cycling.
RS
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 14:20:36 -0700, rangerssuck wrote:

I mentioned a month ago the dumbfuck probably had ice build up inside the cap tube or possibly if equipped the TEV. You might ask where the moisture comes from in a sealed system. Not knowing the service history of this unit I could not tell you if it actually has ice build up or if the system had been worked on prior to dumbfuck purchasing it used. But it sure displays the proper symptoms to be a distinct possibility.
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'Scuse me, but Igor is hardly a "dumbfuck." He can afford to pay professionals, but likes to do things himself, and isn't embarassed about asking for help. There's a lot to be learned from his approach to these things.
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:02:28 -0700 (PDT), rangerssuck

    But what side is the hump on ?
    And is it 'Eye-gor' or 'Ee-gor' ?
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'Scuse me, but Igor is hardly a "dumbfuck." He can afford to pay professionals, but likes to do things himself, and isn't embarassed about asking for help. There's a lot to be learned from his approach to these things. ---------------------------------------------------------- You're wasting your time trying to make these morons understand this issue. Most of them don't know anything more than payday is Friday, and drugs are good. What a sorry lot they are.
Iggy is someone to emulate, not denigrate.
Harold
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Sorry sport, a fridge compressor is pretty simple... compressor, start kit, and a stat to turn it on and off. He has replaced the start kit, the compressor is a sealed unit, which only leaves the controls. The problem is that iggy has more time than sense.
Anymore, appliances have either become disposable, or your service guy has to also be an electronics tech to work on them. The more high end technologies that are built into home appliances, the fewer techs there are that are qualified to work on them. It ain't gramps air conditioner anymore..... The residential systems I am installing and working on now have digitally controlled, variable frequency, inverter drives.
In any vocation, if you don't update your knowledge base and skillset every 3 years, your behind the curve. With the changes and advances in HVAC, its every 6 months to a year..... unless your looking for "Billy-Joe-Jim-Bob" or "Bubba" with the cheapest price. Just remember that you get what you pay for.
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On 9/22/2010 7:15 AM, Steve wrote:

Ma AC ain't a workin, I thank it's th thermostait.
TDD
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You didn't get the memo? It's ALWAYS the thermostat.
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Sort of missed the point, didn't you? I envy anyone that has the balls to try to learn something new. If he has no success, so what? He's doing what he wants to do---explore, in the hopes of learning something. If he succeeds, so much the better. Frankly, we need more people like Iggy, not fewer.
Harold
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There are vocations that require updating your knowledge base often. For electronics the statement often quoted was that half of your knowledge was obsolete in six years.
But HVAC...................... 6 months to a year. You have to be kidding.
Dan
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There are vocations that require updating your knowledge base often. For electronics the statement often quoted was that half of your knowledge was obsolete in six years.
But HVAC...................... 6 months to a year. You have to be kidding.
-------------------------------------
Not kidding at all.... I do approximately 5 semester hours a year in continuing education just to keep up with the new technologies. The newest super high efficiency systems are serial controlled, with variable frequency inverter drives and can vary their output capacity from 40 - 115%. Even the compressors are driven by electronically commutated, variable speed motors. This technology has only been on the streets for a year or so in residential split systems. If you don't have the proper training, you can cause some very expen$ive problems by something as simple as getting 2 control wires crossed. BTW... all these classes, and training isn't free, and the customer pays for *EVERYTHING*.
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Yeahbut... that's electronics, not refrigeration technology. Any new industrial machine you can name has the same new features.
F'instance, the new indoor fan motors pretty much come as 3-phase VFD units, with the VFD built into the motor case. It's a fine technology, but it ups the life-cost to the consumer, because many of the motors do NOT have replacement VFD boards available (especially the low-end GE motors) -- where if a start/run cap failed on an older technology motor, it would cost (the tech) pennies to fix.
But that's (again) all electronics. Show me any _substantial_ changes in refrigeration technology.
LLoyd
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 08:09:56 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

??? Wiring things incorrectly has always been a problem since there were wires.
That doesn't require any new knowledge.
And PLL is not new technology.
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It is new for residential heating and cooling systems, and it does require the knowledge to be able to troubleshoot and repair.
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 08:32:35 -0500, Steve wrote:

A Phase Locked Loop is new how, to residential H/C ?
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

VFD has been around for years in industrial apps, but it is just now showing up in residential HVAC apps.

Its not the refrigeration technologies, other than much higher efficiencies, but rather the change in refrigerants with the changes in pressures and oils in residential HVAC stuff. This change is not new, its been in the works since 1989. Granted, there is a large portion of the "techs" out there who only have a ticket book, jug of gas and set of gages don't know or understand how a refrigeration system works or why it works that way. My company gets called frequently to straighten out their messes because the home owner tried to get it done cheap, instead of calling a licensed, insured, professionally trained, master HVAC tech.
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I have an old US Army refrigeration technology textbook my dad studied from while he was in Diesel school.
Except for azeotropes, there's not one bit of that 1940's technology that has changed one bit. You can still troubleshoot modern units with the superheat tables in it.
Which, by the way, was the only way we charged small systems back in the late 60s, early 70s in Vietnam. Our "kit" consisted of a charging hose (no gauges), two precision thermometers, a wad of heat-conductive putty, and a set of cards with tables for the various units we'd encounter on Swift Boats.
LLoyd
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 08:43:15 GMT, "Harold & Susan Vordos"

Indeed! Well said.
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