Refrigerator Compressor Replacement

I have a Whirlpool refrigerator that needs to have the compressor replaced. The refrigerator currently uses R12. The replacement compressor is a conversion kit to R134A. What is involved in the conversion? Do I have to flush the system and how? Do I need to ad oil, and what type or is there oil in the replacement compressor? Do I need to add service fittings and what type? I do A/C work on cars so I'm familiar with the concepts. Thanks in advance!
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How old is it One good law passed was making new refrigerators more efficent most are 75 % cheaper to run than old ones. You may save 15 to 20 a month on elec costs at .125 KWH giving you 3 - 4 year payback . Replace a compressor and its still inefficent. and old.
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snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net (Andrew Zwickl) wrote in message
Hi,
You doing this yourself??

High and low side are flushed out with Nitrogen.

No oil to add, the replacement compressor comes with the oil allready inside.

Many of the manufactures today do not want us to leave servcie valves on the fridges = pinch off tubing with pinch off tool and weld the end over...many techs do leave valves on incase of the need for future service...like these....
http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R 3&NX5795 Sealed-system drier tube assembly
There are others :)
jeff.
Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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Well, first you need to pierce a line, and recover the R-12. You do have a piercing valve, recovery pump, and a cylinder for R-12? Don't just blow it out, and risk the 5 year, $25,000 penalty. Second, you get your acetylene torch and unbraze the couple fittings on the old compressor. Unhook the electric wires to the old comp. Get your silver braze flux, and your sand screen, and polish up the copper lines that go to the comp. They won't be in the right places, so just braze or silver solder on a couple of couplers, to lengthen the tubes with copper ACR tubing. Set the new compressor in place. Silver braze, or silver solder the suction and discharge lines. Cut to length, and then use sand screen, and fitting brushes to polish the copper to copper connections. Braze or silver solder an access fitting to the process stub of the comp. When it cools, remember to put the valve core in. Cut the discharge line (now that you have it steadied by being soldered or brazed on both ends) and braze in a filter drier. If there is an old one, remove it. Atach your vacuum pump and manifold. Run it down to about 500 microns. Deeper vacuum is better. Get your charge weight scale out, and weigh in some new refrigerant. Should be pretty close to the R-12 charge weight. Turn on your leak detector, and beep for leaks. Wire in the electric power wires. Turn refrigerator on, and you're good to go. So simple, even *I* could do it! I've done several refrig compressor change outs.
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Christopher A. Young
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I'm not a real refrig. mechanic but when the US Navy switched over to R134A it was necassary to first remove the old oil and change to the oil which is compateable with the R134A.
In these instances, we weren't changing compressors, just refrigerant.... The old R12 was pumped out and the system purged with nitrigen, evacuated again, then the R134A was added..
Like I say, I was involved as a refrig. mechanic, but I do know that the old oil was not going to work with the oil use with R134A.
Steve
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You're right about the old oil.
The fellow said he wanted to change the compressor, where most of the oil resides. In this case, it was a non-issue.
Again, you're right. The old mineral oil doesn't work wtih R-134A.
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If you do AC work on cars, then you know that 134a isnt what you use in a stationary cooling application when replacing R12. Also, if you have your EPA 609, (since you do ac work on cars, its manditory) then you should be well aware of what is required.
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