Refrigerator Coil Cleaning - How?

Kenmore 61984100 (Whirlpool?). I have a coil brush, but it might as well be a toothbrush. Can someone give me model-specific instructions?
Thanks.
Mike snipped-for-privacy@onuj.com (reverse domain)
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(reverse domain) This is Turtle.
A compressed air tank with a spraier nozzle to just blow them out.
Take it outside and use a water hose on it.
Get a flate bar nozzle for your vaccum cleaner to get up in the slots and hard to get to places.
TURTLE
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The condensor coils are either going to be on the back of the fridge, or, underneath the fridge . If its underneath, then remove the front bottom grille and youll see the condensor coils. What i do, is, while im using the brush i have my shop vac sucking up the loosened dirt right away. Be careful that you dont break anything under there..go gently with the brush. Go every which way with the brush so that all the dust , dirt, etc...is not hanging there. Brush off the compressor too if is caked with dirt. SHut off the power to the fridge while you are doing this procedure.
dave
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Why bother, Dave ???
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Hold a 2 AA minimag in the same hand as the vac hose.
When you're done, get down on your face and look under, make double darn sure the little fan under there is spinning. If it has a fan. DAMHIKT.
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Christopher A. Young
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shop vac
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I have an air tank (portable) I drape a old sheet around the ref, useing duck tape to hold the sheet, after it has been pulled away from the wall, remove the rear cardboard cover and blow everthing to the front.
Work great I do this once a year.
Tom
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This is Turtle.
If you do this once a year. You will not have a mess on your hands. If you wait 10 years before doing this. You will have a Mess to clean up. This is the hard way but a good one.
TURTLE
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Michael S. Trachtenberg wrote in message ...

The full model number should be 106.61984100 and yes it was made by Whirlpool.

There are no set procedures or any model AFAIK. It usually comes down to your own intuitive, how much work you're willing to put into it and how big a mess you're willing to make (and clean up afterward).
Possibilities may include a shop vac, air compressor or water hose depending on the fridge design and how long it was left without being cleaned. A leaf blower might work on some models although that and the hose should probably be done outdoors. The fridge may be able to be tilted slightly (*while unplugged*) to gain better access.
It's all up to whomever is doing the service.
JMO
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=Kenmore+fridge
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Too bad someone doesn't make a step-on gadget that will lift the frig up say a foot to the fins can be reached.
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Lucking fovely. I must be a complete idiot. One of the reasons I bought this thing is the salesman told me the coils didn't need to be cleaned. That, and it was efficient. My 20-year-old GE had just expired and I didn't have time to research things, so I took his and the energy guide's word for it.
Anyhoo, I cleaned the coils on the GE regularly. They were on the bottom but easy to reach with a coil brush. This thing is a disaster. It's a series of A-coils extending from the front to the compressor. The only access is from the side, by removing a cardboard partition separating the coils from the drip pan. Even with that, there's minimal space to get the brush in and I can barely get my hand in anyhow.
Very discouraging that there is no set procedure or tool for servicing it. The only good news is I had the rear of the unit off and noticed that most of dust is on the front fins. So, hopefully I accomplished something cleaning the front.

The unit is a little under two years old. I'm thinking compressed air, probably from a can. Best I can do in a condo.
Thanks for your (and everyone else's) help.
Mike
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Vacuum cleaner stores sell a very thing rubber attachment for getting under appliances. May help.

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Try a shop vac on backwards -- blow it out.
Also tooth brush taped to the end of a piece of coat hanger wire? Get into some odd spaces?
Guess the salesman didn't do you right.
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Christopher A. Young
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Hi Mike,
Short of taking it outside and using the hose (best!), the shopvac with a crevice tool and condenser brush are the best way to go. I do a lot of them, and some coils are packed so tightly, they're impossible to clean w/out a good brush.
Here's one of the 'skinnier' ones that works well on these low clearance designs: http://www.DavesRepair.com/SaleParts/condbrush.htm
Hope that's of some help.
God bless,
Dave Harnish Dave's Repair Service New Albany, PA www.DavesRepair.com snipped-for-privacy@sosbbs.com 570-363-2404
I'm a 32-year pro appliance technician, and love sharing what I've learned - in a FREE Monthly Appliance Tips Newsletter. (Back issues now posted here too!) www.DavesRepair.com
John 3:3
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I'll look into the brush if the compessed air doesn't work. Mine's apparently now a relic. The hose idea is interesting. Is it really safe to get the insulation wet?
BTW, this whole thing started after I got your newsletter and read the refrigerator article. Mine's fairly new and I've neglected it. Still have to do the petroleum jelly thing on the gasket.
Thanks.
Mike
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Michael S. Trachtenberg wrote:

Coil horizontal on the bottom? Yardstick with an old athletic sock turned inside out. Then vacuum with crevice tool.
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