Refrigerated Dining Area


Imagine this: You have a big wall in your kitchen. Pick a 10 ft section of it and push it out 10 feet, as if you were doing it with CAD software. That's my dining area, jutting off from one side of the kitchen. It connects with the side of the garage like a breezeway, but it was never actually a breezeway (at least per the town's permit department, which shows no records of modifications to this house, built in 1956). In the garage, there's a masonry wall where the kitchen meets it on the other side.
Under only this 10x10 area, there's a crawlspace. It's closed to the outside (sits on cinder blocks like the rest of the house, which has a basement). In the basement, there are two rectangular access holes to the crawlspace. The holes are 9" high by 18" wide. Two feet below the floor, there's just dirt in the crawlspace. No insulation. There's fiberglass insulation in the attic above the space, but I assume there's nothing in the walls because the area is like a refrigerator. 12 degrees colder than the rest of the house. Ridiculous.
The whole kitchen's vinyl floor needs replacement, so after it's torn out, it would be a good time to rip out the wood subfloor in the jutting-out portion. I'd be able to stand right in it and do whatever it needs. I *believe* I need to put plastic over the dirt, and then fill the area with fiberglass bats. This raises questions.
- Two contractors have suggested simply blowing cellulose into the crawlspace. No need to rip out the floor. This sounds fishy to me, however it *is* based on something scientific: It's winter, and they need the work. Ha.
- If I have to tackle just one job at a time, where will I get the most bang for the buck (and the time involved)? Deal with the crawlspace, or tear down the walls and put in fiberglass? They're plaster, and replacing with sheetrock would be pretty straightforward. I have another area I can use for dining temporarily, and I can easily seal the area to contain the mess.
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Blowing cellulose over a dirt floor just sounds crazy to me. I agree with you about the plastic as a moisture barrier. Filling with spray urethane foam may be OK as that would act as the moisture barrier also.
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Might be hard to find a contractor for such a small job, in which case foil faced foam between the studs should be good alternative. Pick the R value you want and keep the foil to the warm side. Upping the R value in the walls would yield a space that could easily be heated by just the two candles you and your bride use for romantic dinners <G>
Joe
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Why would you want to tear down the walls to put fiberglass in? Sounds like this would be a place to use the blown in insulation or expanding foam.
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In my previous house (built 1942), the plaster on one exterior wall was 90% bad, so I took down the wall. I found short crossmembers between some vertical beams. How do you deal with those when blowing in insulation? If I'm going to do this, it's going to be perfect, or it's not gonna be done.
How much is sheetrock for 3 walls, 10' long by 8.5' high? I own the tools already. Seems cheap, in return for seeing exactly what the final result will be.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
<SNIP>

by dropping a weight down the upper hole you will drill anyway.
If you're up to 'rocking the walls, go for it. It will give you an opportunity to apply a vapor barrier film behind the wall surface. And an opportunity to run every wire you've ever wanted :-) or at least put pull-wires in each stud space for future use.
Jim
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Yeah, but then what? Inject whatever from above and below the fire stops? (Saw them called "cats" in an ancient carpentry book).

Did you say speaker wires? :-)
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