Refinishing the top of a Nightstand?

Hi
I have a relatively new piece of funiture (a nightstand) that I spilled nail polish remover on. I tried sanding the section I spilled on and putting old englih on it but the sanding marks showed up. I know I have to sand with finer sand paper and then a rubbin agent but I have a few questions.
1. On the internet I have read that you first have to use a chemical stripper or paint remover first. However, this piece of furniture was just stained with no paint. Do I still need to use a stripper or can I just start sanding?
2. How much should I sand? Should I sand until I see no trace of the old stain or just until I get a smooth surface?
3 What is a rubbing agent? Is it something like Bon Ami?
4. After I restain do I need to put a sealer or laquer of some sort on the stained surface?
Thanks
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 19:46:14 -0500, "Dan Phillips"

You can sand the finish off. A stripper is not needed. Start with an 80 grit, then use a 100 grit, then 150 grit, and finally 220 grit. Always sand with the grain. Be extra careful not to damage the edges and use a sanding block.

Sand until the stain is gone, using the 80 grit.

abrasive used to restore car finishes. You don't need it.

Yes. Polyurethane is a tough finish. A Danish oil will make the wood look beautiful, dries slowly, but offers less protection. Oils are very easy to apply, but be very careful about proper disposal of the used rags. A laquer spray finish dries fast, easy to apply, but gives the wood a plastic-like appearance. After 60 days, apply a coat of Johnson's wax and buff. Oh yeah, be careful with that acetone (nail polish remover).
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This is turtle.
First before you mess up anymore. take some Vasilen and put on the sanded area and let it set over night. This will cut don't on the light colored stain of sanded wood. If this does not fix it , well.
take some sand paper and a big pile of elbow grease and sand it till the whole top is one color. Then Polyurathan and paint it . Do this will you get the right darkness you want. Now if you have to match another coloed type of furnitire in the house you may have to use a stain to get the color right. then Uriathan it.
Now if it happens in the future and have bad water marks on it. just put vasilen on it over night to cut out the water marks.
TURTLE
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<< Now if it happens in the future and have bad water marks on it. just put vasilen on it over night to cut out the water marks. >>
____Reply Separator_____
TURTLE, I don't think finger nail polish remover puts water marks on furniture
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This is Turtle.
Finger nail remover or water does the same thing as it replaces the oil of the clear coat and leaves a color or hazzed discoloration. The Vasaline will replace the oil in the clear coat.
TURTLE
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You are attempting a spot repair which is the most difficult type of repair. The nail polish remover contains acetone and other ketones which are good strippers for lacquer. Unless you have a handmade piece or an antique, you very likely have a lacquer finish. After properly cleaning, this type of damage is typically repaired by filling the hole in the finish with more finish although usually not lacquer. There are materials designed for this type of repair. Sometimes, the hole is minor enough that the existing lacquer can be melted with solvents and reammalgamated over the hole. This will make the finish thinner throughout but you have a better chance at color matching. For the drip-in repair, the repair is usually color corrected in more than one operation. Once the color has been obtained, the repair is leveled. This is where the sandpaper starts coming in. The sheen is then corrected, again using sandpaper or rubbing compounds. If it does not look perfect at six inches away but it does at six feet, you have an acceptable, but not ideal, repair. As you can see, spot repairs are very difficult to do correctly without a fair amount of practice or experience. I suggest that if you are brave, you carefully try to reammalgamate the finish. Otherwise, I suggest getting the color right and carefully sealing it in with fresh lacquer or shellac.
Good Luck.
To contact directly, remove both NGs.

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