Refinishing the garage


We have a small house w/ a one car garage, I would like to make a 3 season room out of the garage and only use the garage for car storage in the winter. Currently it has paneling w/ significant water damage (roof and ceiling repairs have been made) The garage needs to be gutted and re-walled.
I'm looking for suggestions as to what material would be best to re-wall the garage. It seems to me that drywall wouldn't be a good choice because of drawing moisture and I'm wondering if wood paneling would have the same problem. I also need this project to stay low cost.
More than likely this room will serve as a rec room for my kids, so what ever I put in there will have to be pretty durable.
Thanks for any advise,
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Knit Chic wrote:

Is'nt winter when kids would need it the most? Giving them a place any time of year is a help tho..Been there.. Maybe tounge n groove pine if Ya catch it on sale..There is a drywall product called Dens Glass Gold sheathing,,it is tougher than reg 1/2" sheetrock and reportedly mold resistant,,recommended to finish with hot mud(setting type) to increase the mold resistance but I'm sure reg mud could be used..There may be other similar products in 4'x8' or 4'x12' by now too..I used the above sheets in a basement for a "mold fearing" alergic Customer..Went up just like normal rock except a bit harder to cut and screw.. Dunno price per sheet as I did'nt supply it,,just hung,finished smoothe and primed.. MR drywall(greenboard) sheets would resist humidity but are'nt much tougher than normal.. Dean
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Knit Chic wrote:

Well my garage, attached, has all inside walls and ceiling drywalled with 5/8" fire rated as required by local code. I have been here over 10 years, with two cars in an out all seasons including brining in lots of snow during the winter and no problems.
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Joseph Meehan

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Knit Chic wrote:

I assume since you are concerned about moisture that you have slab on grade construction as opposed to a perimeter stem wall?
Since it is a garage which can be subject to some pretty rough use, I would suggest 1/2" (minimum) plywood over the studs & then cover with drywall.
Both the plywood & the drywall should be gapped at least 1/2" at the floor so that water wicking is minimized.
To reduce cost you can scrounge plywood scraps & damaged pieces & just cut them up to usable sizes.
The parts of the garage that abut the house need 5/8 fire rated drywall.
Again, since you have a fully sheathed wall, you can use drywall scraps (it will improve your taping skills)
A good mud will make the whole thing look pretty decent
Prime with ZIinseer Hide Cover Stain, finish with a semi gloss (light color) & you'll have pretty nice room.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

Drywall is used in the vast majority of garages. Drywall is also used on the vast majority of living spaces. Since this garage is going to serve as both, that is what I would use. Moisture should not be an issue, unless some unresolved problem with water is still present. Make sure you use fire rated and follow codes for this, fire rated doors, insulation, etc adjoing the living space.
I also would not waste money on priming with stain killer, as I don't see it buying you anything with new drywall. And I would not recommend semi gloss for large drywall areas, as it will show minor imperfections in the drywall that you would not see with flat or a satin type product. It does have the advantage of being easier to clean, but that usually only rises to a deciding factor in areas like bathrooms or kitchens.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The advantages to using Zinseer are
In reasonable weather you can prime before lunch, clean up, break for lunch paint after lunch, you'll get one finish coat coverage & you'll be all done the same day .
This is a garage, right? not a showroom?
Yeah, semi will show the imperfections but it wears & cleans better....your call.
Flat will show every finger print or bump.....IMO a big potential mistake.
How much of the wall space will be exposed (no furniture / cabinets / shelving?
cheers Bob
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