Refinished hardwood floor curing time ...

We just had our hardwood floors refinished (and stained) with four coats of oil modified urethane. Does anyone know how long it takes for this kind of urethane to reach it's full strengh. I'm hoping to stay off the floor until it's fully cured ... unless it takes months :)
Thanks, Harry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The label on your urethane will tell you.
I think the minwax oil based poly I used was okay to walk on in a day or so, but no furniture for a week I think?
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's not me doing the work, so I don't actually have the label from the can ... so why don't I ask the contractor you say ... well, he does great work, and at a good price, but there's a very big language barrier which makes it hard to talk to him, not to mention the fact that you can only reach him on the cell which cuts in and out making things even harder.
Thanks, Harry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After a day you can start placing things, just be careful and no sliding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry Muscle wrote:

Oil/Varnish (urethane) finishes are Reactive Curing finishes -- they bond with oxygen, or there is a catalyst in the mix -- so when the thinner evaporates a reaction occurs... Cross-linking or polymerization...
I suspect it is oxygen curing -- cures from the top down -- so If the coats are thick (brushed on), I would treat it gently for a month... But that's an _opinion_ -- no facts to base it on till you give more info -- just a suggestion that has a wide safety margin.
You did not specify the brand or the exact type -- so at best people could only guess -- since they have no info on the type.
You got some good advice to call the manufacturer, or look up their web site -- since there is a fair bit of variation in curing times.
Get understanding Wood finishing by Bob Flexner if you want more detail than you could ever wish for.
--
Will R.
Jewel Boxes and Wood Art
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, I'm gonna try to call the manufacturer ... however in the mean time, here's some more information I pulled from the MSDS ...
It's made by Torcan Coatings (www.torcancoatings.com) and it's called Gymnasium Satin. It's an oil modified polyurethane from the aliphatic hydrocarbon chemical family. It's 53% mineral spirts and 9% Silica Amorphous. I'm not sure if this info actually helps anyone, but you guys wanted more info.
Thanks, Harry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry Muscle wrote:

From... http://www.woodworking.com/wwtimes_oilvarnish.cfm
***************************************************** One very important factor when applying varnish is how the temperature effects the speed at which it cures. You should not apply varnish in temperatures lower than 65 degrees. If you apply varnish in lower temperatures it may take several days, even weeks for it to cure. Room Temp. (approx. 70 to 75 degrees) is good for applying varnish. Hotter temps. will make the varnish cure quicker, but the solvent in the varnish will evaporate quicker, making the varnish set-up quickly and you may have a problem getting the varnish to flow out properly. This could result in brush marks, bubbles and an uneven film. When working in temperatures higher than 75 degrees, try not to work on large surfaces. ****************************************************8
Nobody seems to mention specific times -- because...
Temperature *** Humidity Thickness o application layer and Exact oil/varnish ratio sanded between coats?
all make a difference.
I stick with my guess of about a month for close to max. hardness. But it's a _guess_
I am guessing that they brushed it on and had to work quickly -- so the there was not much oil... It should dry harder if so.
Certainly no less than a week...
http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayArticle?articleNum 0119 "Let the varnish cure for several days before placing anything heavy on it so as to prevent any dents being made in the finish. It is a good idea to wipe a coat of clear paste wax on the bottom of any painted object that is placed on the finished project, as this will prevent the two sticking together."
http://www.google.ca/search?q=varnish+curing+time&hl=en&hs=sxm&lr=&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official_s&start &sa=N
--
Will R.
Jewel Boxes and Wood Art
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A lot of manufacturers put a toll-free number or website on their products; have you checked for that and given them a call? They'd probably be the "experts" on how long things take.
Just a suggestion.
Clint

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many variables in that the curing is affected by temperature, etc. Most will dry in 8 to 10 hours, but should not be really used for at least 24 hours. That said, I'd not move furniture back for about a week.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.