redwood fence post repair

We have a small (8 section) basketweave fence that's been around for 40+ years. I recently reworked several of the panels using as much of the redwood as possible and using cedar when I had to replace wood.
The post that holds the large gate has rotted at the bottom (was repaired a couple times) at the top of the last concrete pour.
My idea is to use the original redwood post but to use a pipe to secure the post. My thought is to place a concrete filled pvc pipe into the center of the post, perhaps 3-4 feet deep, glue (or screw) the pipe inside the post and then set the pvc pipe into fresh concrete (again about 2 feet down).
I'm not a woodworker and don't have a horizontal boring machine that could bore a 2 inch hole in the center of a post 3-4 feet.
I've thought of cutting the post in half then routing out the material, placing the pipe, then glueing the two halves together but don't know if I'd just be introducing another failure point with that long joint and weather seapage, etc..
Any thoughts on how a layman could tackle this, or should I try to find someone with a boring machine? (dont know what heading that would be in the yellow pages)
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How about using a sturdy galvanized fence post set in concrete and boxed in with cedar boards? The post would need to be prepared for the gate hardware first, and should be easier to do than salvaging the original post. HTH
Joe
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The goal is to try to salvage the redwood post, since you can't get redwood anymore and if you can find it, it is extremely expensive.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Here's another idea. Take the post out and make a composite post by splicing it to a length of treated wood post. To make the splice, cut the bottom of the redwood post into an upside-down U shape, and cut the treated post so it has a tongue that sticks up and fits into the U. Assemble with glue and wood screws. I think if done well it could be fairly inconspicuous. I would guess the splice need only be 12 or 18 inches long. More trouble than I would go to for a redwood post, but you seem to be willing to put time into it. Whether this would stand up to the stress of being a gate post might be a little dicey.
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scarf joint. should be minimum of 6:1, or 21" or more.
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